LFC NEWS

Watch Klopp's pre-Porto press conference live

LiverpoolFC TV - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 10:00
Watch live as Jürgen Klopp and a member of his squad hold a press conference to preview the second leg of Liverpool's Champions League quarter-final with FC Porto.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Live from Melwood: Watch Reds train ahead of Porto trip

LiverpoolFC TV - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 10:00
You can watch a portion of Liverpool's pre-FC Porto training session live today with our coverage from Melwood.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Oxlade-Chamberlain visits Zoë’s Place Baby Hospice

LiverpoolFC.TV - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 09:30

Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain recently made a visit to Zoë’s Place Baby Hospice in Liverpool.

The visit was organised by the LFC Foundation, the club’s official charity, as the Reds midfielder provided a memorable experience for families who use the hospice regularly.

Zoë's Place is an independent registered charity providing palliative, respite and end-of-life care to babies and infants aged from birth to six years suffering from life-limiting or life-threatening conditions.

As well as handing out special LFC gifts, Oxlade-Chamberlain chatted the families and the staff, posed for photographs and signed autographs.

For more information about Zoë’s Place or to make a donation, click here.

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Oxlade-Chamberlain visits Zoë’s Place Baby Hospice

LiverpoolFC TV - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 09:30
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain recently made a visit to Zoë’s Place Baby Hospice in Liverpool.
Categories: LFC NEWS

‘The best since Barnes’ – Liverpool fans will love Jamie Carragher’s praise for Sadio Mane

ThisIsAnfield.com - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 09:06

Jamie Carragher has explained why he believes Sadio Mane has become one of Liverpool’s most important players, and their best winger since John Barnes.


Mane’s goal in the 2-0 win over Chelsea on Sunday ensured his best-ever tally in a single season for the club, at 21, and it is likely he will add to that in the weeks ahead.

In the last 15 games he has scored 12 goals, raising his game at a vital time with Mohamed Salah netting just five in the same period, and this led him to be a key topic on Sky SportsMonday Night Football.

Carragher, leading the analysis, highlighted how in Liverpool’s last 11 games Mane has been the opening goalscorer on seven occasions, with only two others—Roberto Firmino and Naby Keita—doing so:

? – @LFC's most important player?

He's the top scorer in the @premierleague (excluding penalties) and @Carra23 says Sadio Mané is the best wide player the club have had since John Barnes. ??

Join tonight's #MNF live on Sky Sports PL now or follow: https://t.co/Bi5MEwVIet pic.twitter.com/aXDuH4Lcay

— Sky Sports MNF (@SkySportsMNF) 15 April 2019

“It’s not just the goals he’s scoring, it’s the importance of the goals,” Carragher explained.

“The most important goal is that first goal and very rarely do we see top teams lose or draw from that position.

“You go through the games now, Liverpool’s last 11 games, so the [first] four Mane gets the first goal.

“The opposition does twice but there are only two other Liverpool players in those 11 games who have scored the first goal. That’s how vital they are.

“It’s not just scoring and being top of the charts and getting goals when it’s 4-0 and banging a couple in at the end of the game, it’s the importance of the goals Mane is getting.

“And I think sometimes he goes under the radar.

“We’ve Salah, we’ve got Van Dijk at the back, talk of the goalkeeper, the impact these players have had.

John Barnes, Peter Beardsley, Liverpool, 1988 (Picture by Ross Kinnaird EMPICS Sport)

“Liverpool are going for a first title in almost 30 years. He’s the best wide player Liverpool have had for 30 years.

“You have to go back to John Barnes to when Liverpool have had a player like that.

“And that’s massive coming [from me], because I think John Barnes is possibly in the best five or six players to ever play for Liverpool Football Club.”

This is significant praise from Carragher, and it is difficult to argue with him despite a plethora of talented wingers plying their trade at Anfield over the past three decades.

Interestingly, when asked by Gary Neville who he would rather lose—in a worst-case scenario—for the run-in from Mane or Mohamed Salah, he opted for the latter.

?? – "Mané is the one that got Liverpool back." @Carra23 and @GNev2 look at the impact of wide-men from @LFC and @ManCity on #TheRunIn and the rest of the @premierleague. ?#MNF is live on Sky Sports PL now! pic.twitter.com/XzerEfaS28

— Sky Sports MNF (@SkySportsMNF) 15 April 2019

He described him as “the one that got Liverpool back into the top four,” and who “has been there from the very start,” even claiming if the Reds side of 2008/09 had Mane they would have won the title.

Mane has often been considered third-best, or third in importance, behind Salah and Roberto Firmino in Jurgen Klopp‘s attack, but his form this season has made him invaluable.

It is only right he receives such praise from Carragher, and he makes a convincing case for him over Salah at this stage—though much of his success stems from the freedom he is provided from sides double-marking the No. 11.

Both are worthy of serious plaudits, but this season has really seen Mane come to the fore.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Video: Hillsborough tributes across the city on 30th anniversary

LiverpoolFC.TV - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 20:13

There were poignant tributes at Anfield and across the city of Liverpool on the 30th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster.

Ninety-six children, women and men lost their lives as a result of the events at the FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest on April 15, 1989.

Players from the club’s first-team, Women’s and Academy squads, as well as chief executive officer Peter Moore, laid floral tributes at the Hillsborough memorial at Anfield.

At St George’s Hall, 96 lanterns powerfully honoured the supporters who died in the tragedy, while flags were flown at half-mast around Liverpool.

At 3.06pm, the city paused for a moment of silence and balloons were released at Anfield, where many gathered to mark a period of reflection.

See the tributes in the video above.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Video: Hillsborough tributes across the city on 30th anniversary

LiverpoolFC TV - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 20:13
There were poignant tributes at Anfield and across the city of Liverpool on the 30th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Enrique 'all clear' after brain tumour

Liverpool FC on Sky Sports - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 19:51

Last Updated: 15/04/19 8:32pm

0:40 Former Liverpool and Newcastle defender Luis Enrique reveals he has been given the 'all clear' after a brain tumour (Instagram: joseenriquee3) Former Liverpool and Newcastle defender Luis Enrique reveals he has been given the 'all clear' after a brain tumour (Instagram: joseenriquee3)

Former Liverpool and Newcastle defender Jose Enrique has been given the 'all clear' after a brain tumour.

Enrique, 33, retired in September 2017 after a spell with Real Zaragoza and was working as an agent when he was diagnosed with a chordoma in his skull, prompting fears he could lose his sight.

He first realised something was seriously wrong after suffering headaches while meeting with Brighton manager Chris Hughton.

He was initially treated in London, but once the diagnosis was known, Enrique returned home to Valencia to have the tumour removed at La Fe hospital.

Following an MRI scan a week and a half ago, Enrique said on Monday that doctors had told him the area "is clean and looking amazing" - adding that it was "the best news".

Enrique joined Newcastle from Villarreal in 2007 and made over 100 league appearances before switching to Liverpool in 2011.

He spent five seasons at Anfield before joining Real Zaragoza in 2016.

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Hillsborough, 30 years on: A human tragedy that touched the world of football

ThisIsAnfield.com - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 19:06

Thirty years on from the Hillsborough disaster and with respect pouring in from across world football, Jeff Goulding pens a touching tribute to a human tragedy.


Hillsborough is a tragedy that has become synonymous with one city. Today, touching tributes have poured in once again from across the world of football, all of them offering their support and solidarity with the people of Liverpool. They are all gratefully received.

However, the ramifications of the disaster that unfolded in Sheffield 30 years ago today have been felt far beyond the confines of the city of Liverpool. Hillsborough is the country’s tragedy; it is football’s tragedy.

The idea that Hillsborough is purely a Liverpool issue has led to several unhelpful attitudes and behaviours over the years. At the time of the disaster it made it easier for some to shift responsibility onto a city that had already been cast in the role England’s troublesome child.

Much later a column edited by Boris Johnson wrongly branded Liverpool as a ‘self-pity city’. This deepened the hurt and made the campaign for truth and justice much harder to fight.

Sadly, today we hear these ideas parroted still on the terraces of football grounds around the country. Supporters of other English clubs still sing about Scousers who, they say, have a victim mentality. In doing so they unwittingly participate in the sort of stereotyping and victim blaming that has exacerbated the pain and misery that has plagued the survivors and families of the deceased for 30 years.

 Peter Kemp / AP/Press Association Images)

It also ignores the fact that Hillsborough could easily have happened to supporters of any English club. The Hillsborough Independent Panel Report highlighted several incidents, prior to 1989, in which a similar disaster could have happened.

Nor is the public or football supporters’ interests served when we turn on each other in the name of ‘banter’.

Then there is the very real hurt caused to the many of the victims of Hillsborough who are not from Liverpool, but who have suffered greatly in its aftermath. Forty-one of the 96 who perished were from other parts of the UK. Their families are rightly just as angry and equally vocal.

Louise Brookes, the sister of Mark Brookes, who died in the Sheffield catastrophe, lays this out in a statement to a government report into the treatment of the Hillsborough families. The report is entitled ‘The patronising disposition of unaccountable power’, and it is authored by the Right Reverend James Jones.

It is a powerful and moving documentary of the experiences of those caught up in the aftermath of the tragedy. In it Louise points out that, in addition to the deceased, many of whom came from outside Liverpool:

“The survivors are also from all over the UK. Two of the lads who tried to save my brother were from Devon. Five out of the seven women who died were from London.

“When people refer to it only being a Liverpool disaster, it makes me feel like my brother is invisible.”

Invisible. How utterly debilitating and despairing must it feel to believe that your experience has been overlooked. How hard must it be to labour on for decades, fighting for truth and justice and to feel that you are invisible?

Many of us who were born and raised in Liverpool are immensely proud of the way our city has come together in the aftermath of the tragedy. We are not defined by the tragedy, but I believe we are defined by our response to it.

We could have fractured, we could have succumbed to the many unnecessary challenges that came our way, but we didn’t. Instead we united and stood shoulder to shoulder with each other. Irrespective of our footballing allegiances we all saw that this was a human disaster.

We believed and still feel that an injury to one of us is an injury to all of us. I will always be proud of Liverpool for this.

However, those who campaigned tirelessly came from all corners of the country. There are bereaved families in London and other places who feel the pain and anger every bit as much as any Scouser.

Many of the survivors and those who fought to save the lives of the stricken and injured on the pitch that day came from all over the land, not just from Liverpool. They were simply ordinary people placed in extraordinary circumstances.

All of those involved would have chosen to continue their ordinary lives over the horror they witnessed; content to consider Hillsborough as the name of an ordinary football ground, instead of the all-consuming memory it has become.

 Trevor Hicks, Margret Aspinall, Kenny Dalglish, Lord Mayor of Liverpool Roz Gladden, Marina Dalglish, Lord Mayor's consort Roy Gladden and Professor Phil Scraton with their medals before a Conferment of the Freedom of the City of Liverpool for the 96 Victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster at the St. George's Hall. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Many survivors feel that way, rather than wallowing in self-pity, they wish they’d never heard of the word Hillsborough. No one involved should be defined by the disaster itself, nor by their city of their birth.

So, as we move past yet another milestone in the post-Hillsborough landscape, we should recognise now more than ever that Hillsborough was a human catastrophe that touched not just one city but the world of football and beyond.

It is also one whose lessons have meaning for all of us, regardless of who we are or where we are from.

Sadly, we cannot bring back those lost loved ones or restore the years of peace that have been stolen, certainly not with mere words. As James Jones says in his report:

“…there can be no closure to love, nor should there be for someone you have loved and lost. Furthermore, grief is a journey without a destination.

“The bereaved travel through a landscape of memories and thoughts of what might have been.

“It is a journey marked by milestones, some you seek, some you stumble on. For the families and survivors of Hillsborough these milestones have included the search for truth, accountability and justice.”

This is equally true for those who have suffered the loss of someone they care for as it is for those who mourn the loss of the life they once knew or the future they will never know.

 Liverpool supporters form a mosaic '96' to remember the victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster during the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Only by our actions can we contribute to that journey. Our solidarity with all those affected by the disaster in whatever way, and wherever they are from, is as important now as it has been at any time in the last three decades. It will continue to be for years to come.

If the tragedy teaches us anything at all, it is that there is strength in unity of purpose and solidarity between people. That applies to all of us, regardless of our club allegiances or city of birth.

Justice for the 96, justice for all.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Andy Robertson insists Liverpool are more interested in Tiger Woods than Man City

ThisIsAnfield.com - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 17:45

Liverpool’s players underlined their focus is on this season’s Premier League title bid by watching the Masters golf rather than rivals Manchester City’s victory over Crystal Palace.


Pep Guardiola’s side briefly returned to the top of the table with a 3-1 win at Selhurst Park after kicking off two and a half hours before the Reds’ 2-0 defeat of Chelsea at Anfield.

It is a scenario which will occur in the next two rounds of fixtures as City will again play before Liverpool.

But defender Andy Robertson said the players have become well-versed in blocking the outside noise.

“We had the golf on. I wanted Tiger to win it,” said the Scotland captain.

“I was watching it with James Milner in the treatment room. I’m sure some of the lads were aware of the City score but it wasn’t something we spoke about.

“We didn’t know the City result beforehand but because we hadn’t heard anything we just guessed they had won.

“This is the first time a lot of us have found ourselves in a position like this and you have to enjoy experiences like this.

“I think we’re all enjoying it. You saw that with our performance against Chelsea.

“Hopefully, we’ll be celebrating come the end. But we know there’s a lot of hard work still to be done.”

 Liverpool's Andy Robertson takes a throw-in during the FA Premier League match between Everton FC and Liverpool FC, the 233rd Merseyside Derby, at Goodison Park. (Pic by Laura Malkin/Propaganda)

While much of the talk has been about City winning a quadruple this season, Liverpool are still chasing a Premier LeagueChampions League double.

They head to Porto on Tuesday with a 2-0 advantage to take into their quarter-final second leg.

“We want to go as far as possible in the Champions League and we’re taking it right to the wire in the Premier League, whether we win it or not remains to be seen,” added Robertson.

“We want to win every competition we’re in and we’ll go flat out for both but we know how hard it’s going to be.

“Every game is so big at this stage of the season. Every team is fighting for something and there’s a lot more pressure on you.”

Merseyside Police are investigating after a flare was thrown shortly after Sadio Mane scored Liverpool’s opener against Chelsea.

“Following this officers received reports a young Chelsea fan, believed to be nine years old, had been taken to the first aid centre where he was treated by St John Ambulance staff after suffering a panic attack as a result of the flare,” said a Merseyside Police statement.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

WATCH: Liverpool's Hillsborough tribute

Liverpool FC on Sky Sports - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 15:08

Last Updated: 15/04/19 3:45pm

1:04 Players and staff from Liverpool's first team, women's squad and academy teams honoured the victims of the Hillsborough disaster at Anfield on Monday Players and staff from Liverpool's first team, women's squad and academy teams honoured the victims of the Hillsborough disaster at Anfield on Monday

Liverpool players and staff paid their respects at the Hillsborough Memorial at Anfield on Monday on the 30th anniversary of the disaster that claimed 96 lives.

The players laid wreaths and observed a period of reflection.

A minute's silence was held at six minutes past three, to mark 30 years on from the time the 1989 FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough was stopped.

In the city centre, at St George's Hall, the Mayor of Liverpool Joe Anderson was among those paying their respects.

Anderson said: "Today is about remembering those who lost their lives so innocently on that day.

0:29 Mayor of Liverpool Joe Anderson lays a wreath to the victims of the Hillsborough disaster at St George's Hall, 30 years on from the tragedy Mayor of Liverpool Joe Anderson lays a wreath to the victims of the Hillsborough disaster at St George's Hall, 30 years on from the tragedy

"The city always does it with dignity and respect, and we felt this was a good opportunity to have a memorial for people to come and lay their own tributes and remember the 96.

"That's what it's about today, it's about families, it's about supporting them as the city has always done for 30 years and will continue to do so."

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Mane puts Liverpool in control LIVE!

Liverpool FC on Sky Sports - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 15:07

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Liverpool players pay respects at Hillsborough memorial

LiverpoolFC.TV - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 13:49

The Liverpool first-team, Women's and Academy squads paid their respects to the 96 children, women and men who died at Hillsborough by visiting the memorial at Anfield on Monday.

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the disaster, which unfolded during the FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest on April 15, 1989.

Players and staff from across the club’s teams, and chief executive officer Peter Moore, paused to remember the 96 and laid floral wreaths at the dedicated Hillsborough memorial at Anfield.

See their tributes in the video above and gallery below.

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Liverpool players pay respects at Hillsborough memorial

LiverpoolFC TV - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 13:49
The Liverpool first-team, Women's and Academy squads paid their respects to the 96 children, women and men who died at Hillsborough by visiting the memorial at Anfield on Monday.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Was this goal better than Salah's?

Liverpool FC on Sky Sports - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 12:03
Salah helped Liverpool to 2-0 win over Chelsea, Boateng struck in win against Port Vale

Last Updated: 15/04/19 12:22pm

0:30 Hiram Boateng scored an incredible goal to wrap up a 2-0 win for Exeter against Port Vale on Saturday. Hiram Boateng scored an incredible goal to wrap up a 2-0 win for Exeter against Port Vale on Saturday.

Mohamed Salah hit a stunner in Liverpool's win over Chelsea - but did an Exeter midfielder score a better goal this weekend?

Just two minutes after Sadio Mane had given Liverpool the lead at Anfield on Sunday, Salah produced some smart control to bring down a long Virgil van Dijk pass before cutting inside and firing a powerful strike into the far corner past goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga.

Cardiff vs Liverpool

April 21, 2019, 3:30pm

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Sky Sports' Jamie Carragher described it as "an absolute rocket", while fellow pundit Ashley Cole reckoned no goalkeeper in the Premier League would have stopped it.

0:54 Mo Salah secured Liverpool the three points in their contest against Chelsea with a sublime strike from outside the area. Mo Salah secured Liverpool the three points in their contest against Chelsea with a sublime strike from outside the area.

But was it actually the best goal scored in England this weekend?

Hiram Boateng may have gone one better with his effort in Exeter's 2-0 win at home to Port Vale in League Two on Saturday.

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Play-off chasing Exeter took the lead with a penalty in the second minute but Boateng put them in complete control with a wonder goal 10 minutes into the second half.

Boateng, with his back to goal, controlled a long pass on his chest, teed the ball up with a neat touch as he spun around and then bent a volley into the far corner with the outside of his left foot.

"You can't predict goals like that, but Hiram is a player that can produce moments like that," said Exeter boss Matt Taylor after the game.

So, which goal was best? Vote in the poll above to have your say…

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A Liverpool fan’s memories of Hillsborough and finding catharsis & purpose at Anfield

ThisIsAnfield.com - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 12:00

At Anfield twice over the weekend, Steven Scragg reflects on his memories of the Hillsborough disaster, and how Liverpool play such a big role for his family.


Human nature is a strange, almost unquantifiable concept.

While a gang of Chelsea followers sang racist songs in a bar in the Czech capital last week about Mohamed Salah, posting the footage on social media where it was liked and shared by far too many people, supporters of the same club came to Anfield yesterday and paid impeccable respect to the 96 souls we lost 30 years ago today, in Sheffield.

Conversely, having managed to observe one minute of silence, most of those Chelsea supporters who came to Anfield later indulged in a chorus or two of ‘Always the Victim’.

As they saw it, they were given their excuses to do so when a couple of red pyros were lobbed from the Anfield Road upper tier, into the away section below, after Sadio Mane had opening the scoring.

 Andrew Yates/Sportimage via PA Images

When Salah scored his stunning goal, the sense of karma was palpable. Cue wild celebrations and a round of V’s being directed at the away end.

Human nature isn’t a black-and-white entity, it plays itself out in multicoloured motion. There are two polar extremes of tolerance to intolerance, offset by a variety of shades in between.

Whichever extreme is our natural starting point, we will drift inwards a few shades from time to time.

When Salah scored, I was giving V’s to the Chelsea supporters, after initially bouncing and tumbling around in celebration, embracing everyone within reaching distance. So was my 80-year-old dad, who was stood next to me.

Boss?? pic.twitter.com/iJfzY2aBIr

— Dilan Mistry (@Dilanmistry_14) 14 April 2019

You’ve all seen those photos of Kenny Dalglish, Margaret Aspinall and Sami Hyypia? That was the way it felt.

I like to think I’m a tolerant soul, but I edged along a shade or two by flicking V’s to the Chelsea supporters. It might sound like something and nothing, but opposing supporters usually make no impact on me at all.

Maybe it was a little unresolved residue frustration from that game five years ago, as much as it was the stereotypical projection of the common or garden Chelsea supporter, singing their songs about Salah, Steven Gerrard and Hillsborough?

As far as I’m concerned, it is their human right to be obnoxious, as much as it is my human right for it not to leave an imprint on me.

Fans create a mural before kick off on the eve of the 30th anniversary of the Hillsborough tragedy during the Premier League match at Anfield, Liverpool. (Andrew Yates/Sportimage via PA Images)

I was at Anfield on Saturday, to help lay out the Hillsborough mosaic. If you haven’t done it before, then come and do it next time.

It is a cathartic experience and there is a sense of purpose to it. There was a huge sense of pride and sadness seeing it in all its glory, prior to kickoff.

I later found out someone else with connections to This Is Anfield was there on Saturday. It’s a small world. We had circulated one another for three hours, without realising, then departed the ground without the opportunity to introduce ourselves.

It has been unusual that we’ve reached mid-April with something this big riding on the outcome of our league games. Balancing introspection and expectation, balancing pain with pleasure feels disorientating.

It is incredulous that 30 years have passed. It was so sunny that day; it was so hot that day. It still feels so raw.

Part of me forever remains lodged on April 15, 1989. It is where my usual state of tolerance comes from. It is where the sense of perspective I’m told I possess comes from.

 Liverpool's Mohamed Salah celebrates scoring the second goal during the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

What does it really matter if Jordan Henderson is asked to play a holding role in midfield, leaving him to blend into the background, when far worse things have happened?

However, Liverpool are everything. They provide indescribable highs and pained lows. I go to games with my dad, and they have increased in importance. He lost his wife in October; I lost my mum. At 80, I won’t have him around forever.

It will mean the world to me if I can share another league title-winning Liverpool team with him, to go with all those ones we took for granted in the 1980s. If it isn’t to be, though, it has still been a joy sharing this wild ride with him, a joy money cannot buy.

I wrote an article about Hillsborough year or so ago, for a now-defunct website called Row Z. The website was run by Harry Collins. Harry is a Man United supporter and he’s a rather fantastic person.

Harry ran a ‘Liverpool Week’ on his website and asked me if I was willing to contribute a piece on the Hillsborough disaster.

Nobody had ever asked me to write about Hillsborough before and I’d never broached the subject voluntarily either. I’d always kept the subject an internal matter, when it came to how it affected me personally.

 A general view of Anfield with an official match day programme marking 30 years since the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Just like laying the mosaics, it was another invaluable and cathartic experience. It brought a sense of peace.

A United fan facilitated me feeling immeasurably more at ease with a dark cloud that has always lingered stubbornly.

Human nature you see. It isn’t something that is based within which team you support, it is a state of mind that is ingrained on an individual-to-individual basis, regardless of tastes in football, music, food, drink, clothes or religion.

Basically, we all either lean towards a natural propensity for tolerance, or intolerance.

Up the Reds. RIP the 96. Sleep well mum.

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Remembering the 96, and the impact of Hillsborough on Liverpool – 30 years on

ThisIsAnfield.com - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 10:01

Monday, April 15, 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster. Here, Chris McLoughlin recalls his memory of the day that saw 96 lose their lives.


It’s the queuing I remember. Queuing in an eerie silence I had never heard before. Standing there, with thousands of others, just waiting.

I can’t remember exactly where we joined the queue. Somewhere alongside the railings next to Stanley Park car park, I think, where the ‘hats, caps, scarves, badges or yer t-shirts’ fella usually was. But he wasn’t here today. It wasn’t a matchday.

I’d only ever been to Anfield before to see Liverpool play. It was always noisy outside the ground. But this was different. Very different. It was the moment when it brought home to me exactly what had happened at Hillsborough.

I wasn’t at Hillsborough on April 15, 1989. I wasn’t allowed to go to away matches. I was 11, in my last year at junior school. Considered too young.

In any case, my dad was a Blue who used to stand on the Kop during Merseyside derbies so there’d probably have been more chance of me being taken to Villa Park to see Everton that afternoon if we’d gone to a cup semi-final.

It had been hard enough persuading him to take me to Anfield from 1987 onwards—he made me go to Goodison Park too as a condition (in a last-ditch and ultimately failed attempt to convince me I should be a Blue)—but away games were out of the question. Our family went to buy a new washing machine instead.

I spent the afternoon watching the tragedy unfold on 20 tellies in Curry’s. The magnitude of what was happening didn’t initially sink in.

At first I remember being disappointed that the game had been called off and there wouldn’t be any highlights on TV that night (neither FA Cup semi-final was screened live in 1989—both were 3pm kickoffs but BBC Grandstand switched live to Hillsborough as the tragedy unfolded).

Then, as talk of a death toll emerged, the realisation that Liverpool fans had actually died kicked in.

The following morning I turned up to play for my Sunday League under-12s side. All the talk was about Hillsborough.

The older brother of one of the lads in our team had gone to the game. He was OK. I can’t say for certain, but I think he’d been sat in the upper tier of the Leppings Lane end. I remember feeling glad he was alright and that now I actually knew someone who’d been there.

 Liverpool supporters form a mosaic '96' to remember the victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster during the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

We held a minute’s silence before the game. The silence of people queuing outside Anfield to pay their respects lasted a lot longer. It was hours before we got into the ground. No-one complained. We just queued.

As we did so I’d thought to myself that for the first time I’d actually get to walk on the Anfield pitch and stand in front of the Kop. That was an exciting prospect. I’m sure I was not the only 11-year-old in that queue who was thinking along those lines.

My excitement immediately disappeared when I entered the ground, down in the corner of the Annie Road end, next to the old Main Stand.

Seeing Anfield’s pitch and the Kop covered in flowers on the telly was one thing, seeing it with my own two eyes was another. It took my breath away.

This wasn’t Anfield. Not the Anfield I’d been to before. This was a shrine. A shrine of the like I’d never seen before and have never seen since.

 Flowers and tributes left by supporters at the memorial to the 96 victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster, the 15th of April marks the 30th anniversary of the disaster, pictured before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

It sounds ridiculous, 30 years on, to think of this, but I remember specific things that had been placed on the pitch. An umbrella. Flowers that spelled out You’ll Never Walk Alone. A mirror, in a red frame, that had the classic club badge of the time engraved into the glass.

And I can still see what I can only describe as a haunting vision of thousands of scarves, but not thousands of people, tied to the crush barriers on the Kop.

You know how people attach padlocks to railings, gates and bridges in tourist locations now? Like on the black fences down by the Mersey, near the Albert Dock? It was like that, but with scarves of every different colour instead of padlocks.

It felt like someone had stolen all the people and left scarves where they once stood.

My mum laid flowers on the pitch, a pitch now covered with floral tributes, beyond the Kop end penalty box. There was no particular reason for that spot, it was simply where the ever-lengthening queue of flowers had got to. It was the next available space the stewards directed us to.

My brother and I had taken our treasured Liverpool scarves with us. We’d only got those scarves quite recently, if memory serves me right during the 1987/88 season—my first proper full season of being a match-going Red.

 Scarves and floral tributes left at the Shankly Gates at the Memorial Service to remember the 96 victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster in 1989. (Photo by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

They were our ‘best scarves’. Much thicker, warmer and redder than our originals.

I dunno about our kid, but I remember being reluctant to part with mine at first. It was only when we’d walked back down the Kemlyn Road touchline towards the Annie Road end that I decided to leave it there.

I gave that scarf to a steward who tied it to the side-netting, that glorious, stringy, loose-looking red netting, on the goal down the Anfield Road end.

By then I’d only ever sat in the Annie Road end to watch Liverpool, in the multi-coloured seats in the section now used for away fans as that’s where the adult-child section used to be.

It seemed somehow appropriate that my scarf ended up down that end, but no-one was allowed to walk to the goals. The steward took it instead.

We left the ground via the away terracing in the corner of the Kemlyn Road Stand and I remember looking back towards the Kop and thinking how eerie Anfield was.

 David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Thirty years on and I can remember that day as if it was yesterday, so I cannot begin to imagine how the families and friends of the 96 and the Hillsborough survivors feel today.

I doubt there’s nothing different that can go through their heads today than has been doing so for the last three decades. All I can do is admire their strength.

I know of someone still being treated for their physical injuries from that day. I know survivors who carry the mental trauma of it with them every day. I have a friend who was in the upper tier at Hillsborough 30 years ago today and now can’t remember what she saw due to dementia.

I know there are thousands of others who remain affected 30 years on. I know there are kids who have grown up without a parent, parents who have grown older without their kids.

And I know all of them—frustratingly—have to be as silent as Anfield was in the aftermath in 1989 today because nobody can risk prejudicing the ongoing legal process.

 Mascots Beth Garner-Watt, 11, and Mikey Clarke, 8, stand for a minute's applause to remember the 96 victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster before the Premiership match between Everton and Newcastle United at Goodison Park. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

I’m thinking of them all and the 96 today. And I know you are too. #JFT96

Chris McLoughlin writes for This Is Anfield each week; he’s also senior writer for the Official LFC Matchday Programme and LFC Magazine.

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“World-class” Mo Salah lauded for wondergoal vs. Chelsea as Liverpool vow to “fight until the end”

ThisIsAnfield.com - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 09:41

Mohamed Salah was singled out for praise as Liverpool players took to social media to share their delight at clinching three points against Chelsea on Sunday.


The Reds continued their winning ways with a scintillating victory over the Blues at Anfield, a result which moves Jurgen Klopp’s side back to the top of the Premier League table with four games remaining.

While Liverpool had initially struggled to find their range in front of goal in the first half, there was no such concern early in the second as two goals in three minutes put the result beyond doubt.

The goals arrived courtesy of a Sadio Mane header, his 21st of the season, and a thunderbolt of a strike from Mohamed Salah, both of which caused Anfield to erupt as they paved the way for the 26th win of the campaign.

 Liverpool's captain Jordan Henderson celebrates his side's first goal during the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

And it was a performance which “delighted” Jordan Henderson, as the skipper reflected on the result and his role in lead up to the opening goal when speaking to LFCTV after the game:

“It was a brilliant day overall, two great goals, a clean sheet and a top performance really—so overall we are delighted.

“But we can’t think about [the result] too much because we’ve got a game in a few days so we’ve got to recover well and concentrate on that.

[…]

“I can remember, I think, someone was tackled and I was thinking of counter-pressing in the box to win it back quickly and managed to get there first.

“And then when I was at the byline I managed to dink it to the back stick where Sadio was waiting, thankfully.

“That was an important goal, but then the second one was an amazing strike by Mo so I’m delighted for him as well.

“[Salah’s] obviously got that in his locker, but to be fair when he’s come inside and it sat up nicely I thought he was going to hit it.

“It was a top strike that put us at 2-0 and that gave us the control we needed really, and we could’ve gone on to score one or two more.”

 Liverpool's Trent Alexander-Arnold celebrates his side's first goal during the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Similarly, Trent Alexander-Arnold, heaped praise on Liverpool’s Egyptian winger and commended his side’s show of “patience” in the immediate aftermath of the victory:

“We showed that we’re a really good side and we’ll be patient.

“I think maybe that was the difference today as maybe a few weeks ago we would have got a bit frustrated and moved a bit too forward in the first half and left ourselves vulnerable.

“But we took our time and we closed them out and never gave them too many chances, and in the second half we came out all guns blazing and finished them off.

“[Salah’s goal was] unbelievable! It changed direction a few times and it seemed like it went in slow motion.

“It’s good to see him back amongst the goals and overcoming that so-called ‘goal drought’ that everyone said he’s in, but he showed again why he’s a world-class player.

“I think people are maybe expecting a little bit too much from him this season, it’s a little bit unfair with the standards he’s probably set himself from last season.

“But he’s in and amongst the leading assists and goals so he’s showing week in and week out that’s he’s a world-class player and game-winner for us.”

Taking to Instagram after the game, Henderson and Dejan Lovren both looked to shine the spotlight on the “yoga man” after an inspired performance helped the Reds seal all three points:

Gini Wijnaldum and Virgil van Dijk, on the other hand paid tribute to the “amazing” Anfield faithful on what James Milner described as a “special day” for the club:

Meanwhile, Fabinho, Alexander-Arnold, Roberto Firmino and Andy Robertson all celebrated the “massive win” whilst insisting they will “fight until the end” as the race to the title continues:

Liverpool’s win over Chelsea comes as yet another boost to the team’s title credentials as Klopp’s chargers again ensured questions continue to be asked of Man City.

However, focus will now temporarily shift to the Champions League as a trip to Porto awaits on Wednesday, where Liverpool hold a two-goal advantage in the quarter-final tie.

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Klopp sets Liverpool points target

Liverpool FC on Sky Sports - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 08:12
Cardiff vs Liverpool is live on Sky Sports Premier League on Sunday

Last Updated: 15/04/19 8:23am

Jurgen Klopp are one point shy of their record Premier League points haul Jurgen Klopp are one point shy of their record Premier League points haul Jurgen Klopp are one point shy of their record Premier League points haul

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp has set his sights on a club-record 97 points as the race for the Premier League title enters its final month.

A 2-0 win over Chelsea restored the Reds' two-point advantage at the top of the table after Manchester City, who have a match in hand, had briefly taken back first place with a win at Crystal Palace earlier in the day.

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The Reds now have 85 points, five short of their previous league best of 90 from 40 matches in the 1987-88 campaign in which they were champions.

City won the league with 100 points last season but Klopp is targeting four more wins to push their rivals all the way over the closing few weeks.

5:27 Mohamed Salah joins Jamie Redknapp to look back on his sensational goal that secured Liverpool's 2-0 win against Chelsea at Anfield Mohamed Salah joins Jamie Redknapp to look back on his sensational goal that secured Liverpool's 2-0 win against Chelsea at Anfield

"The biggest challenge for us is always facing the world outside, [the media] and other people. We play our game," he said

"If City lost and we find out five minutes before the game that's not a help. You lose your focus then.

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"We only try to collect as many points as possible. What is it now, 85? Four games to play. 97 [possible]. Let's try.

"And if that's enough, then perfect. If not, we cannot change it. And we didn't lose it here or there or whatever.

4:42 Jurgen Klopp felt his Liverpool team dominated the game against Chelsea and fully deserved the three points in their 2-0 win which sees them stay at the top of the table Jurgen Klopp felt his Liverpool team dominated the game against Chelsea and fully deserved the three points in their 2-0 win which sees them stay at the top of the table

"We see it game by game. We go to Porto now [in the Champions League], which will be a tough one.

"We know that they get at least two players back, Pepe and [Hector] Herrera, so they will be an interesting and difficult challenge.

"Then we play Cardiff and everybody knows that is a tough place to go."

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Where will PL title be won or lost?

Liverpool FC on Sky Sports - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 06:00
Liverpool are two points ahead of Manchester City at the top of the Premier League table but have played a game more

Last Updated: 15/04/19 6:08am

Liverpool and Manchester City are battling for the Premier League title Liverpool and Manchester City are battling for the Premier League title Liverpool and Manchester City are battling for the Premier League title

Where will the Premier League title be won and lost?

Liverpool are two points clear of Manchester City at the top of the table after both sides won on Super Sunday. However, City have a game in hand, so will clinch the title if they win their final five matches.

Speaking after Liverpool beat Chelsea on Super Sunday, Jamie Carragher, Graeme Souness, and Ashley Cole gave their verdict on the title race and where points might be dropped over the final month...

The Run In - Remaining fixtures Date Liverpool fixtures Date Man City fixtures April 21 Cardiff (A) - SSPL April 20 Spurs (H) - SSPL April 24 Man Utd (A) - SSPL April 26 Huddersfield (H) - SSPL April 28 Burnley (A) - SSPL May 5 Newcastle (A) - SSPL May 4 Leicester (H) - SSPL May 12 Wolves (H) May 12 Brighton (A) Jamie Carragher

"When you are winning with ease, it shows the class City have got, but when they have that game between now and the end of the season in the league - there may be one, there may be two, there may be none - how will they react? Because they don't have it that often.

"I was at the game in the Champions League against Tottenham in midweek and it wasn't as easy, and they didn't come through with flying colours when it was a tight, even game.

"The hope for Liverpool is if City do get in situations that Liverpool are finding themselves in almost week in, week out, then Liverpool have almost built a belief that they will come through those moments, whereas it will be interesting to see how City react as they haven't had to do it often this season.

"After the international break, I thought City were big favourites and were in the box seat, but with Liverpool coming through against Spurs, Southampton, and now Chelsea, even though City could have a one-point lead [if they win their game in hand] I think it's 50-50.

"Liverpool had to get over these three games, and now they have four left. Right now, I couldn't split them."

0:30 Mohamed Salah joins Jamie Redknapp to look back at his sensational goal in Liverpool’s 2-0 win against Chelsea at Anfield Mohamed Salah joins Jamie Redknapp to look back at his sensational goal in Liverpool’s 2-0 win against Chelsea at Anfield Graeme Souness

"I think the dangerous game for City is the Manchester United one, as derby games are notoriously hard to predict, and the dangerous one for Liverpool is Newcastle away. Cardiff will want to go to war, but Liverpool, with their back four and midfield, will deal with it, and the front three will get a goal or two.

"Huddersfield are already thinking of next season, then Newcastle is a worry. The way Rafa Benitez sets his team out, he is quite happy to sit back, absorb pressure and then catch them on the break. Tactically he is very good, and the supporters will be right up for that game.

2:59 Highlights from Manchester City's win over Crystal Palace in the Premier League Highlights from Manchester City's win over Crystal Palace in the Premier League

"Ideally you would have been wanting Wolves to get to the FA Cup final so their minds would have been elsewhere, because we have seen they do well against the big teams.

"The games that I think will decide the league are Liverpool at Newcastle and City at Old Trafford."

Ashley Cole

"It will be difficult but I think if City come through these next three games [Tottenham in the Champions League on Wednesday followed by Tottenham and Manchester United in the Premier League], they will win the title.

"To come through three big games unscathed and still be top of the table, even though one game is in the Champions League, then I think they will go on and win it. But Liverpool are like a train at the minute, they are not stopping."

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