LFC NEWS

Watch free: LFCTV's 'When We Were Kings' documentary

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sun, 04/05/2020 - 08:45

Graeme Souness and Kenny Dalglish sit in silence for a split-second.

One is incredulous, frowning in familiar fashion.

The other wears a smirk as broad as the stand they rechristened in his honour.

“Can you remember,” asks Souness carefully. “Where you were when…”

Dalglish: “Yep.”

Silence.

“I’ve not asked the question yet,” scowls Souness.

“Yeah, but I know what you’re going to say,” shrugs Kenny.

“Can you remember where you were… when Liverpool won the European Cup in 1977?”

“Yep,” fires back Dalglish, rocking smugly in his seat, eyes widening with mischief.

More silence.

So begins When We Were Kings, LFCTV’s fascinating trip down memory lane with two of the club’s greatest ever players.

The hour-long documentary is available to watch for free today when you register with LFC, and will be broadcast on LFCTV at 9pm BST.

Originally aired in the run-up to the 2018 Champions League final against Real Madrid, the film is a throwback to an era when the Reds ruled Europe.

Stripped down to a cross-table conversation between two old teammates, the stories tumble out in all styles; from convivial and comedic to emotive and analytical.

Souness and Dalglish first crossed paths fleetingly as youngsters trialling for Celtic.

The Hoops were one of Europe’s finest teams having won the European Cup under Jock Stein in 1967.

Souness would trek to Parkhead from Edinburgh while Dalglish made the significantly shorter trip to training from his home near to Glasgow’s bustling docklands.

“I was the posh Jock,” says Souness, smirking at his friend.

Dalglish: “You were?”

Souness: “Yeah. Being from Edinburgh.”

Dalglish: “Oh yeah. Definitely. You could see that; you even did your nails when you were only 15.”

Legendary status awaited Dalglish at Celtic.

During nine seasons at the club his wizardry conjured 167 goals in 320 appearances.

Souness’ career took a different path.

Two years at Tottenham Hotspur preceded a switch to Middlesbrough before being reunited with Dalglish at Liverpool, the reigning European champions, in January 1978.

Within months, the gleaming trophy had been retained at Wembley, where the pair combined for the only goal of the European Cup final against Club Brugge.

The celebrations were wild.

“Did I not wake you up in the middle of the night?” asks Souness, reclining in his seat.

“You came to the door, rocking-and-a-rolling,” replies Dalglish. “And you phoned down to reception and you said, ‘Two bottles of champagne.’”

“‘On Mr Dalglish’s room,’ I think I said. What time was this?”

“Half nine in the morning or something. You’d already been to see your mum and dad at 5am.”

“I woke them up with a bottle of champagne,” says Souness, staring into the middle distance with a warm glow on his features. “I showed them my medal.”

In 1981, Liverpool won the European Cup for a third time against Real Madrid in Paris.

Three years later, the Reds were back in the final again. Only this time, they would face AS Roma in Rome.

The bearpit lay in store.

“We're having a pre-match lunch,” begins Souness while Dalglish grins in anticipation, his memory piqued instantly by his old friend’s opening line.

“At the end of the lunch Joe Fagan stood up and he’s tapped his spoon against his glass and has asked, ‘Excuse me boys, can you leave?’ to the waiters.

“And we’re thinking: team meeting? Teamtalk? – which we never did. He stood up and it was obvious very quickly that he was talking to himself.

“He said, ‘Big game tonight’ – that’s true, European Cup final. ‘These must be a good team, they’ve won the league and they’ve got World Cup winners.

“‘They beat some good teams on the way here. Now, make sure you’re not late for the bus that leaves at quarter past five.’ That was it.

“He was talking to himself! ‘Make sure you’re not late for the bus at quarter past five’ – and that was the teamtalk to play a European Cup final.”

It worked.

Amid a cacophony of noise, Liverpool ran out winners in a nail-biting penalty shootout to claim the European Cup for a fourth time.

Souness, who had dominated the Romans in their own domain, emulated Emlyn Hughes at the Stadio Olimpico and hoisted the trophy high.

“How many great players never get within touching distance of that?” he ponders, leaning forward in his chair, motioning to the European Cup perched alongside him.

Voice wavering with emotion, Souness presses on: “We got to touch it three times.”

Silence.

“We did it again and again. Each time it got better and better.

“I would love to go back for – alright, I’ll be greedy – one year. Around about 80-81.”

Silence.

“What a city it was then.”

Tune in to LFCTV at 9pm BST or click here to register with LFC and watch When We Were Kings for free now.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Watch free: LFCTV's 'When We Were Kings' documentary

LiverpoolFC TV - Sun, 04/05/2020 - 08:45
Graeme Souness and Kenny Dalglish sit in silence for a split-second.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Goal of the Day: Luis Garcia's dipping Juve drive

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sun, 04/05/2020 - 08:30

Luis Garcia scored in style against Juventus on this day in 2005.

The No.10 produced a swerving half-volley from all of 25 yards that dipped over Gianluigi Buffon to double Liverpool's lead over their star-studded opponents.

The Reds would go on to win this Champions League quarter-final first leg at Anfield 2-1 en route to glory in Istanbul.

Watch Garcia's wonderful strike again below.

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Goal of the Day: Luis Garcia's dipping Juve drive

LiverpoolFC TV - Sun, 04/05/2020 - 08:30
Luis Garcia scored in style against Juventus on this day in 2005.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Kids Quiz: European Cups, captains, Anfield & all things Red

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sun, 04/05/2020 - 07:00

It is quiz time once again and this one looks at everything Liverpool past and present, and is perfect for the kids.

Throughout Liverpool’s long and illustrious history there have been countless players and managers who have contributed to the club’s success.

And here, we see if you can identify a player from the picture provided, can pick out the right managers and more.

12 questions on everything Liverpool, give it a go here! MORE ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS:

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Liverpool’s furlough decision: Socialism for the rich

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 21:55

Like Tottenham and Newcastle, Liverpool have turned to the government’s furlough system to pay staff in the coronavirus pandemic, but it is patently wrong to do so.

Liverpool released a “COVID-19 update” on Saturday afternoon, announcing that some of the club’s non-playing staff will be placed on furlough.

The move will apply to around 200 workers who have been affected by the lack of football being played as well as the closing down of club shops and other operations while the Premier League is on hold.

The announcement stated that the club will continue to make sure these staff members receive 100 percent of their wages.

What wasn’t clear was the fact that 80 percent of these wages, up to a monthly cap of £2,500, will be paid for by the government and, ultimately, the taxpayer, with Liverpool topping up the other 20 percent—or more in the event any of these workers are on more than £2,500 per month.

“Liverpool FC has placed some staff who are impacted by the Premier League suspension on furlough,” read the statement.

“The club has confirmed those staff will be paid 100 percent of their salaries to ensure no member of staff is financially disadvantaged.

“Last month the club also confirmed that it would pay its matchday and non-matchday staff while the Premier League is suspended.”

 Liverpool Football Club’s retail store at Liverpool One is closed due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19). (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Though the 80-20 split wasn’t indicated in this statement, perhaps intentionally, the use of the word “furlough” reveals that they will be using the government scheme.

For a club owned by a billionaire to be using government money, state money, ultimately taxpayer money, in order to make up for some of their losses during this time is, to put it mildly, irresponsible.

It is especially so when as much money and resources as possible are desperately needed in those areas of society tackling the coronavirus head on, and dealing with the numerous issues it raises for the most vulnerable within communities.

Jurgen Klopp showed compassion for all at the start of this pandemic, senior players heavily involved in @premierleague players taking wage cuts. Then all that respect & goodwill is lost, poor this @LFC https://t.co/9bE8Rw1veE

— Jamie Carragher (@Carra23) April 4, 2020

The club does a lot of good work in the community through Red Neighbours and supports numerous local charities and organisations, but a cold-hearted business manoeuvre such as this must be disheartening for those involved in these areas, as well as for many supporters.

Given the awareness shown by several players, as well as manager Jurgen Klopp, around such issues, there might be a number of people throughout the club who won’t be too pleased with this decision.

Lots of 'it's practical' talk, but a disappointing move from Liverpool, who made a pre-tax profit of £42m and increased turnover to £533m in 2018-19 and are owned by a man with a net worth upwards of £2bn. Undercuts a lot of the good work they've done during this crisis.

— Melissa Reddy (@MelissaReddy_) April 4, 2020

Players have led the way

 Liverpool's captain Jordan Henderson (L) celebrates with Andy Robertson after the FA Premier League match between Tottenham Hotspur FC and Liverpool FC at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium. Liverpool won 1-0. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

A large, anonymous contribution recently made to a Glasgow foodbank was believed to be from Andy Robertson.

No PR spin, no publicity, just a contribution to where it was needed from someone with money to spare and remembers their roots.

Robertson probably hated the fact that the Times found out he was the source of the donation.

Thanks to the Scottish footballer who donated a large sum to the following food banks, including us; @GSWfoodbank @Glasgow_NW_FB @GlasgowSEFBank @CR_Foodbank and East Renfrewshire Foodbank. Without the support of generous individuals we would struggle. We cannot thank him enough

— GlasgowNEfoodbank (@GlasgowNE) March 18, 2020

The Liverpool squad, along with Red Neighbours and the LFC Foundation, contributed £40,000 to Fans Supporting Foodbanks—an increasingly vital resource as shopping for supplies has been difficult even for those who can afford them, let alone those who need to use foodbanks.

Then, Jordan Henderson led the call for Premier League players to give up some of their salaries to help the NHS and various causes during this time, which would mean they still receive their wage as normal, so their tax would still be paid as normal, but they would be giving money to where it is most needed.

The club’s move to take taxpayer money to pay wages which are a drop in the ocean to them is undoing these positive contributions from the players, both financially and ethically.

Let's say it's 200 staff at an ave. of £1,800pcm for 2 months. That's £720,000 getting taken out the public purse from a company that filed £42m profit last year.

It's will take more than £720,000 in PR costs to turn public opinion around. Disappointing and baffling decision.

— Daniel Nicolson (@danielnicolson) April 4, 2020

This is part of the reason the players, via the PFA, have not bowed to the pressure being put on them to take a wage cut.

It’s a heated topic in the football bubble at the moment. Why don’t the players take a pay cut?

The better question would be, why did the Tories target Premier League footballers for criticism, and not the even richer club owners? (Or other larger businesses…)

Looking beyond the huge sums Premier League players earn, it’s really no surprise that the Tories’ target was not the clubs and their owners, many of them billionaires, but the players.

Many footballers are from working-class backgrounds. They also happen to be, and/or have worked hard at being, really good at a sport which can earn them a lot of money regardless of their class, background or upbringing.

 Liverpool's Andy Robertson during the pre-match warm-up before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Southampton FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

This doesn’t sit well with right-wing governments who like the money to remain in the hands of the ruling elite, whether they be monarchy, high-ranking politicians, bankers or any of the big businesses and corporations who help them ensure this money remains their hands and doesn’t filter down.

Should players be forced to take pay cuts? No. The amount of tax they pay (if they pay it as they should) is useful in itself, and a pay cut would just be saving the owners money rather than it going to where it is needed.

Should those with surplus money (which is most Premier League footballers) be choosing to give their money to where it is needed in order to help during this crisis? Yes, and the PFA have indicated that this is what the players want to do, but they are also aware that a salary reduction would only benefit the club owners, and not necessarily the areas of society most in need of funds.

“Taking a 30 percent salary deduction will cost the Exchequer substantial sums,” read a PFA statement on behalf of the players.

“This would be detrimental to our NHS and other government-funded services. The proposed 30 percent salary deduction over a 12-month period equates to over £500 million in wage reductions and a loss in tax contributions of over £200 million to the government.

Matt Hancock called on Premier League footballers to take a pay cut (Pippa Fowles/Crown Copyright/10 Downing Street)

“What effect does this loss of earning to the government mean for the NHS? Was this considered in the Premier League proposal and did the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock, factor this in when asking players to take a salary cut?”

The NHS should not be seen as a charity, but the fact it has been underfunded for so long comes on the back of 10 years of a Conservative government.

Putting the onus on the players is a handy get-out for the Tories and the billionaires they support across all industries.

Socialism for the rich…

 A statue of former Liverpool manager Bill Shankly pictured before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Newcastle United FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Liverpool supporters might have expected their club to be different to the likes of Spurs and Newcastle, and they had committed to paying staff in full for the rest of the season. But even though they are still being paid in full, the club are no longer footing the full amount.

Next time someone at ownership level trots out ‘This Means More’, ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ or some mention of Shankly’s values, these will now feel like little more than PR platitudes. Hollow marketing slogans.

CEO Peter Moore almost admitted as much when, in an interview with Spanish media outlet El Pais, he alluded to using Shankly’s beliefs in their marketing.

“Even today, when we talk about business, we ask ourselves: ‘What would Shankly do?’. What would Bill say in this situation?” said Moore.

“He was a true socialist who believed that football consisted of working together. In the marketing department, we met and said: ‘Let’s put this into words’.”

What would Shankly do in this situation?

As Mirror columnist Brian Reade pointed out: “Doubt he’d have said let the taxpayer pay some wages when you’ve just made £42m profit.”

Football clubs *are* held to different standards. I haven’t obsessed over McDonalds or British Airways since I was a kid. They don’t represent me or the community I come from. I like to think LFC do. Or should do. A decision has been made from high up and it doesn’t sit right.

— Gareth Roberts (@robbohuyton) April 5, 2020

The list of companies who shouldn’t be taking this handout which was, according to the BBC, “designed to support firms that have been badly hit,” is long but depressingly unsurprising. And many aren’t even topping up wages to 100 percent as Liverpool are doing.

The likes of Virgin Atlantic owned by billionaire Sir Richard Branson and Topshop owned by billionaire Sir Richard Green (there is a knighthood theme here too), Wetherspoons and McDonalds, are all rich enough to pay workers through this period, but are all turning to state funding because it saves them a few pennies.

The rich are big fans of state benefits and socialism at times like this, just as the banks quite liked it when the taxpayer bailed them out in 2008, but they return to their quest of making sure these benefits don’t apply for the poor, or make sure they are vilified for claiming them, as soon as they are out of the mire.

Think about the degree of stigmatizing and the endless attacks on those individual people who seek benefits….

— Sid Lowe (@sidlowe) April 4, 2020

When front-line NHS workers are still without the required personal protective equipment, putting their lives in danger every minute of every day in order to help others, and when the social care sector is more strained than ever, as much state money as possible is needed at the face of the crisis and the support structure behind it.

 A Liverpool supporter's flag "Unity is Strength, Scouse Power" on the Spion Kop before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Leicester City FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

It is needed in communities like those around Anfield, St James’ Park and the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.

It might ultimately be given by the players, while the clubs take away, yet the players are still the target.

It definitely isn’t needed by football clubs and other big businesses run by billionaires who want to save an amount of money which barely registers in their accounts.

Even if Liverpool go back on this decision, which may be the right thing to do and be another example of Fenway Sports Group listening to the supporters, this initial decision will still leave a sour taste and alienate even more fans who are getting increasingly sceptical of the way many football clubs are run.

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Footballers highlight problem with UK government’s wage cut request

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 21:00

The Professional Footballers’ Association says Premier League players want to make “significant financial contributions” but warned a 30 per cent pay cut would have far-reaching implications.

The Premier League met with all clubs, the PFA and LMA in a conference call on Saturday afternoon to discuss its suggestion of wage deductions or deferrals as they look at the financial impact of the coronavirus crisis.

Top-flight professionals have been coming under increasing pressure to take a drop in pay, especially with clubs from the Premier League to League Two placing non-playing staff on furlough leave under the Government’s coronavirus job retention scheme.

A PFA statement on behalf of the Premier League players said: “All Premier League players want to, and will, play their part in making significant financial contributions in these unprecedented times.

“Going forward, we are working together to find a solution which will be continually reviewed in order to assess the circumstance of the COVID-19 crisis.

“The players are mindful that as PAYE employees, the combined tax on their salaries is a significant contribution to funding essential public services – which are especially critical at this time.

“Taking a 30 per cent salary deduction will cost the Exchequer substantial sums. This would be detrimental to our NHS and other government-funded services.”

Health Secretary Matt Hancock weighed in on the topic during the government’s daily briefing on Thursday when he said Premier League players should “take a pay cut and play their part”.

Matt Hancock called on Premier League footballers to take a pay cut (Pippa Fowles/Crown Copyright/10 Downing Street)

The PFA addressed those remarks, as the statement continued: “The proposed 30 per cent salary deduction over a 12-month period equates to over £500m in wage reductions and a loss in tax contributions of over £200m to the government.

“What effect does this loss of earning to the government mean for the NHS? Was this considered in the Premier League proposal and did the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock factor this in when asking players to take a salary cut?”

The PFA says it is happy to continue talks with the Premier League, which on Friday pledged an advance of £125million to the EFL and National League as well as a £20m donation to the NHS and other community causes.

The PFA statement added: “£20m is welcome, but we believe it could be far bigger.

“The EFL money is an advance. Importantly, it will aid cashflow in the immediate, but football needs to find a way to increase funding to the EFL and non-league clubs in the long-term.

“Many clubs require an increase in funding just to survive. We believe in our football pyramid and again stress the need for solidarity between all clubs.

“Going forward, we are working together to find a solution which will be continually reviewed in order to assess the circumstance of the COVID-19 crisis.”

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Jamie Carragher among those to criticise Liverpool’s decision to furlough staff

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 20:11

Former players Jamie Carragher and Stan Collymore turned on Liverpool after the Premier League leaders became the fifth top-flight club to announce they have furloughed some non-playing staff during the coronavirus pandemic.

The PA news agency understands around 200 staff, whose work is effectively idle during the Premier League suspension, have been affected by the decision.

Liverpool, who in February announced pre-tax profits of £42million for 2018-19, will top up the public money received from the government to ensure the affected staff receive their full salaries.

Liverpool are following Tottenham, Newcastle, Bournemouth and Norwich in turning to the government’s job retention scheme during the suspension of the Premier League, a decision which impressed neither Carragher nor Collymore.

Carragher retweeted the club’s statement and wrote: “Jurgen Klopp showed compassion for all at the start of this pandemic, senior players heavily involved in @premierleague players taking wage cuts. Then all that respect & goodwill is lost, poor this @LFC”

Collymore was even more forthright as he wrote: “I don’t know of any Liverpool fan of any standing that won’t be anything other than disgusted at the club for furloghing staff.

“It’s just plain f****** wrong.

“Fellow football fans, furlough is for small business staff to keep those small businesses from going bump!

“Every Premier League owner has serious cash, and make money from skyrocketing values of clubs, so what aren’t you getting about YOUR owners dipping into THEIR pocket?”

Jurgen Klopp showed compassion for all at the start of this pandemic, senior players heavily involved in @premierleague players taking wage cuts. Then all that respect & goodwill is lost, poor this @LFC https://t.co/9bE8Rw1veE

— Jamie Carragher (@Carra23) April 4, 2020

Liverpool’s announcement came as Premier League clubs were meeting with representatives of players and managers to discuss possible wage cuts for first-team staff.

A Liverpool club statement read: “The club have confirmed those staff will be paid 100 per cent of their salaries to ensure no member of staff is financially disadvantaged.

“Last month the club also confirmed that it would pay its matchday and non-matchday staff while the Premier League is suspended.”

In February, Liverpool published their accounts for 2018-19, showing turnover for the year was up £78million to £533million, although profits fell in relation to the previous year after a record £223million investment on players.

While their former heroes were unimpressed by the club’s actions, a spokesperson for the Spirit of Shankly supporters’ group said they were in favour of the move to ensure all employees received their full salaries.

“The starting point of this was when the competitions were first suspended, we immediately contacted the club and made it clear that we expected all non-playing staff to be treated fairly throughout the duration of the suspension,” the group told the PA news agency.

 Liverpool Football Club’s retail store at Liverpool One is closed due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19). (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

“The club gave an undertaking to do that which they’ve maintained throughout.

“The use of the furlough scheme maintains that commitment and it ensures that all lower-paid staff who run a variety of contracts will continue to receive 100 per cent of their wage. That’s got to be seen as a positive.”

Talks between the Premier League, Professional Footballers’ Association (PFA) and League Managers’ Association (LMA) on potential wage cuts are taking place on Saturday.

Liverpool skipper Jordan Henderson has been at the forefront of talks between Premier League club captains on a co-ordinated player response.

The Premier League said on Friday clubs will consult with players over wage reductions and deferrals amounting to 30 per cent of salary.

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Liverpool’s 80 days of heaven as Reds secure remarkable cup treble

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 19:00

After a barren run without silverware, Liverpool, under the guidance of Gerard Houllier would secure a memorable treble in a spell-binding 2000/01 season in cup competitions.

You wait ages for a bus, in this case trophies, and three came along in swift succession for Liverpool in the early years of the new millennium.

Prior to the start of the 2000/01 season, Liverpool had failed to collect any silverware since the League Cup success six years prior in 1994/95.

Roy Evans was at the helm during that time, a man who would later share the reigns with Gerrard Houllier for a few short months before the Frenchman went it alone at the end of 1998.

Change swept through Anfield in the early days and years of Houllier’s tutelage, with the key arrivals of Sami Hyypia and Stephane Hechoz – who would solidify what was a fragile defence.

Gerard Houllier (right), who has joined Liverpool Manager Roy Evans, to form a managerial partnership at Anfield, today (Thursday). See PA Story SOCCER Liverpool. PA Photos

Markus Babbel and Jamie Carragher would join the centre-back pairing at full-back, while a young Steven Gerrard was earning his stripes and slowly creating a name for himself.

Dietmar Hamann, Gary McAllister, Patrik Berger, Vladimir Smicer and Nick Barmby would all provide much-needed experience alongside the young pair of Gerrard and Danny Murphy.

While in attack, the trio of Robbie Fowler, Michael Owen and Emile Heskey were all on hand, and the forward line would be added to in January 2001, with the signing of Jari Litmanen.

Liverpool’s Premier League campaign in 2000/01 would end with a third-place finish, secured on the final day with a 4-0 win over Charlton, to qualify for the following season’s Champions League.

But this season would be defined by the Reds’ exploits in the cup competitions, as a remarkable treble would come the way of Liverpool.

Robbie Fowler holds up the Worthington Cup after his side beat Birmingham City following a penalty shoot-out in the Final, at the Millennium Stadium, in Cardiff. 25-Feb-2001 (Picture by David Jones PA Archive/PA Images)

The first trophy of the season returned to Anfield on February 25, 2001, in the League Cup final, which was then known was the Worthington Cup, against Birmingham City.

The Reds overcame Chelsea, Stoke, Fulham and Crystal Palace to set up the meeting with Birmingham at the Millennium Stadium – the first of two finals at the ground which would be decided on penalties for Liverpool.

Robbie Fowler had notched the opener in stunning fashion, only for Darren Purse to equalise at the death from the spot. Extra-time followed without a goal and the Reds would go on to win the competition 5-4 on penalties as Andrew Johnson saw his effort saved by Sander Westerveld.

The FA Cup was next, a competition which Liverpool had not won since 1992, to secure the domestic cup double, in a final widely known as the ‘Michael Owen Final’.

Arsenal were the opposition and the Millennium Stadium was, again, the setting on May 12, a day the game was to be decided in 16 dizzying second-half minutes.

Liverpool's injured club captain Jamie Redknapp lifts the FA Cup with Robbie Fowler (right) and the rest of the team after victory over Arsenal in today's FA Cup Final at the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff. The cup was presented by the Duke of York. (Picture by David Jones PA Archive/PA Image)

After assuming control of proceedings on a sweltering afternoon, Arsenal were the ones to launch a sustained period of pressure, and the Reds’ resistance would eventually wilt when Freddie Ljungberg scored in the 72nd minute.

But Michael Owen and Liverpool had other ideas, with the 21-year-old netting a sensational late double within the final 10 minutes of regulation time, all in the space of five miraculous minutes.

There would be no comeback, extra-time or penalties for Arsenal, with Liverpool lifting their sixth FA Cup, and they were now not the verge of historic treble when they made the trek to Dortmund four days later for the UEFA Cup Final with Alaves.

Nine goals, two red cards and a lesson in how not to defend would follow, but, ultimately, it would all end in Liverpool becoming the first team to win three cup competitions in one season.

Liverpool's Robbie Fowler celebrates scoring the fourth goal with team mates (from left) Gregory Vignal, Nicky Barmby and Steven Gerrard during the UEFA Cup Final at the Westfalen Stadium, Dortmund.

Markus Babbel and Gerrard got Houllier’s side off to a flying start as two goals were on the board after 16 minutes, before the Spaniards pulled one back merely 10 minutes later, in what was a sign of the surreal things to come.

McAllister would restore the two-goal buffer from the spot before half-time, only for a double from Alaves’ Javi Moreno to ensure the scores were level until the 73rd minute.

Fowler had only just been summoned from the bench before he found the net with a sumptuous solo effort to see Liverpool move within touching distance of the trophy.

But, as ever, the Reds failed to do anything the easy way and with just two minutes remaining, Jordi Cruyff would net to see the scoreboard read 4-4 and set up a golden goal extra-time, where McAllister’s free-kick would be famously turned into the net by Alaves’ Delfi Geli. Game over.

 David Davies / PA Archive/Press Association Images)

Relief and delight flowed through players and fans alike in equal measure, with a report in the Guardian, stating:

“Liverpool rejoined European football’s scroll of trophy winners last night and did so in a manner which would have defied belief in the professional, pragmatic days of Bill Shankly and Bob Paisley.”

The class of 2001 immortalised their names into the history books in the most unforgettable of ways, with the manner of the victory over Alaves aptly bookending what was a remarkable, record-breaking season.

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Liverpool place some non-playing staff on furlough

Liverpool FC on Sky Sports - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 14:43
The move to place staff of furlough labelled 'poor' by former Liverpool defender Jamie Carragher

Last Updated: 05/04/20 10:31am

Liverpool have announced they have placed some non-playing staff on furlough as the Premier League remains suspended due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

It is understood around 200 staff, whose work has been affected by the suspension of the Premier League, have been furloughed.

The move was criticised by former Liverpool players Jamie Carragher and Dietmar Hamann.

Carragher tweeted: "Jurgen Klopp showed compassion for all at the start of this pandemic, senior players heavily involved in Premier League players taking wage cuts. Then all that respect & goodwill is lost, poor this Liverpool FC."

Jurgen Klopp showed compassion for all at the start of this pandemic, senior players heavily involved in @premierleague players taking wage cuts. Then all that respect & goodwill is lost, poor this @LFC https://t.co/9bE8Rw1veE

— Jamie Carragher (@Carra23) April 4, 2020

Former Germany international Hamann tweeted: "Astonished by the news that Liverpool FC takes advantage of the furlough scheme to claim 80 per cent of non-playing staffs wages back of the government. That's not what the scheme was designed for. Contrary to the morals and values of the club I got to know."

Astonished by the news that @lfc takes advantage of the furlough scheme to claim 80 % of non playing staffs wages back of the government. That’s not what the scheme was designed for. Contrary to the morals and values of the club i got to know

— Didi Hamann (@DietmarHamann) April 4, 2020

The announcement came after Premier League clubs met with representatives of players and managers on Saturday to discuss possible wage cuts for first-team staff.

The league's 20 sides met on Friday, when they unanimously agreed to consult their players over a "combination of conditional reductions and deferrals amounting to 30 per cent of total annual remuneration".

Liverpool join fellow Premier League clubs Tottenham, Norwich, Newcastle and Bournemouth in placing staff members in furlough.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme sees the government step in to cover 80 per cent of wages for the next two months, capped at a maximum of £2,500 a month.

Liverpool have pledged to top up any wages of any staff member put on furlough to ensure they continue to receive their full salary.

Jordan Henderson is understood to be involved in organising a fund to help fight the coronavirus pandemic Jordan Henderson is understood to be involved in organising a fund to help fight the coronavirus pandemic Jordan Henderson is understood to be involved in organising a fund to help fight the coronavirus pandemic

A Liverpool club statement said: "The club have confirmed those staff will be paid 100 per cent of their salaries to ensure no member of staff is financially disadvantaged.

"Last month the club also confirmed that it would pay its matchday and non-matchday staff while the Premier League is suspended."

Premier League players have come under pressure from a number of politicians this week, including Health Secretary Matt Hancock, to "play their part" during the coronavirus pandemic by taking a pay cut.

'On furlough' - what does it mean?

HM Revenue & Customs says: "If you and your employer both agree, your employer might be able to keep you on the payroll if they’re unable to operate or have no work for you to do because of coronavirus (COVID-19). This is known as being ‘on furlough’.

"Your employer could pay 80% of your wages through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, up to a monthly cap of £2,500.

"You’ll still be paid by your employer and pay taxes from your income. You cannot undertake work for your employer while on furlough."The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is expected to be up and running by the end of April.

Source: Gov.uk

Liverpool revealed their first-team players have been in discussions with the club from the beginning of the Premier League suspension to ensure the club's staff are not financially hurt by the situation.

The statement added: "Even prior to the decision on staff furloughing, there was a collective commitment at senior levels of the club - on and off the pitch - with everyone working towards a solution that secures jobs for employees of the club during this unprecedented crisis.

"There is ongoing active engagement about the topic of salary deductions during the period matches are not being played to schedule. These discussions are complex and as a result the process is ongoing."

The club also said a "significant" donation had been made to St Andrews foodbank in north Liverpool from first-team players and the Liverpool FC Foundation, while the club have launched their own foodbank appeal.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Liverpool FC statement: COVID-19 update

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 14:29

Liverpool Football Club is continuing to deal with a range of challenges caused by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and would like to update supporters on the progress that has been made to date.

While our priority from the outset has been to focus primarily on the health and wellbeing of our players, staff, supporters and local community, the club has also committed to playing as full a role as possible in the Premier League’s ongoing response to the crisis.

As such, we welcome Friday’s announcement from the Premier League which confirmed the provision of support for the National Health Service, the EFL and National League and a commitment for the 2019-20 season to resume only when it is safe to do so.

At club level, various other measures have been taken to protect the best interests of the club and our staff in both the short term and the long term, with all such actions being undertaken following various internal discussions. In some instances, further measures will follow only once all parties are in a position to proceed and updates will be provided as and when this is the case.

Liverpool FC has placed some staff who are impacted by the Premier League suspension on furlough. The club has confirmed those staff will be paid 100 per cent of their salaries to ensure no member of staff is financially disadvantaged. Last month the club also confirmed that it would pay its matchday and non-matchday staff while the Premier League is suspended.

Even prior to the decision on staff furloughing, there was a collective commitment at senior levels of the club – on and off the pitch – with everyone working towards a solution that secures jobs for employees of the club during this unprecedented crisis. There is ongoing active engagement about the topic of salary deductions during the period matches are not being played to schedule. These discussions are complex and as a result the process is ongoing.

In addition, with the health and wellbeing of all club staff being of paramount importance, a number of proactive steps have been taken to assist staff during the crisis. Steps include regular updates from the chief executive to keep staff informed of decisions and latest information and a new online portal providing health and wellbeing information and key contacts. This also includes guidance from the club’s sports psychologist on mental health and wellbeing and healthy eating advice from the club’s head of nutrition. The club has also launched a new learning and development platform providing specific help with adapting to working from home and dealing with remote working.

Liverpool FC has also been actively working with its players, Liverpool FC Foundation and the club’s community outreach programme, Red Neighbours, to ensure its community response is targeted to help local families in food crises and those that are socially isolated. A significant donation has been made to St Andrew’s foodbank in north Liverpool by the first-team players and Liverpool FC Foundation, an emergency foodbank appeal was launched by Liverpool FC Foundation to help those in need and LFC staff are continuing to volunteer to help ensure families have food throughout the crisis and beyond.  

The club also launched ‘LFC Connect’; a social isolation initiative aimed at telephone contact with the most vulnerable in our communities. Our fan services team have been busy contacting the elderly and vulnerable and having a virtual cuppa with them.

For those who would normally participate in our schools and community programmes, we have filmed virtual sessions and exercise routines that can be done at home in order to keep fitness levels up. These fitness-at-home videos cover virtual chair yoga, walking football for our team of over-50s, mindfulness and fitness and football coaching for the tens of thousands of children who participate in our weekly programmes.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Liverpool FC statement: COVID-19 update

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 14:29
Liverpool Football Club is continuing to deal with a range of challenges caused by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and would like to update supporters on the progress that has been made to date.
Categories: LFC NEWS

10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.10

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00

When the club reached the final of the Champions League in 2013, 502,567 supporters applied for 24,042 tickets. The population of the city itself is 581,612 - the eighth-largest in Germany.

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10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.10

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00
When the club reached the final of the Champions League in 2013, 502,567 supporters applied for 24,042 tickets. The population of the city itself is 581,612 - the eighth-largest in Germany.
Categories: LFC NEWS

10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.9

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00

Dortmund and Athletic Bilbao are the only clubs who have made it from the third qualifying round all the way to the quarter-finals of this season's Europa League.

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10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.9

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00
Dortmund and Athletic Bilbao are the only clubs who have made it from the third qualifying round all the way to the quarter-finals of this season's Europa League.
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10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.8

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00

It has been estimated that around 800 to 1,000 people travel from Britain to attend a BVB home match.

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10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.8

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00
It has been estimated that around 800 to 1,000 people travel from Britain to attend a BVB home match.
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10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.7

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00
When Dortmund beat Liverpool in the 1966 Cup Winners' Cup final at Hampden Park, they became the first German team to win a European honour.
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10 facts about Borussia Dortmund: No.6

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 04/04/2020 - 12:00
BVB's sporting director, Michael Zorc, holds the record for the most appearances for the club. The German midfielder played 463 times in the black and yellow.
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