LFC NEWS

Liverpool make move to sign Talles Magno

LiverpoolFC TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 13:21
Liverpool are reportedly battling it out with Benfica to sign Vasco da Gama starlet Talles Magno.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Kop 10: Adam Lallana goals

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 12:00

Adam Lallana celebrates his 32nd birthday today and to mark the occasion, we have selected our 10 favourite goals by the midfielder.

From clinical efforts to fancy footwork – and one of the most dramatic late winners of recent times – the compilation is well worth a look.

Watch our picks in the free video below…

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Kop 10: Adam Lallana goals

LiverpoolFC TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 12:00
Adam Lallana celebrates his 32nd birthday today and to mark the occasion, we have selected our 10 favourite goals by the midfielder.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Watch: Every Premier League goal - 2003-04

LiverpoolFC TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 10:00
Watch every Premier League goal Liverpool scored in the 2003-04 season in our YouTube video.
Categories: LFC NEWS

Watch: Every Premier League goal - 2003-04

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 10:00

Watch every Premier League goal Liverpool scored in the 2003-04 season in our YouTube video.

The Reds clinched qualification for the Champions League tournament they would win in Istanbul by finishing fourth in the top flight.

Fifty-five goals were scored along the way - watch them all back again below...

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Watch free: On the March with Kenny's Army

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 09:01

On the March with Kenny's Army, the story of Liverpool's double-winning 1986 side, will air tonight on LFCTV at 9pm BST.

You can also watch the documentary for free on LFCTV GO today by registering with LFC for free.

Read on for a taste of what the feature-length film has to offer…

There’s something captivating about watching Alan Hansen squirm.

Something oddly absorbing seeing him strain and shrug and shudder.

For large parts of On the March with Kenny’s Army, he shakes his head.

And yet the film tells the story of Liverpool’s first-ever league and FA Cup double in 1986. To which Hansen, the captain, was key.

The fact that he is so painstaking in reliving the tough times from a rollercoaster campaign is testament to his own incredibly high standards.

It’s testament to how he, and his teammates, lived and breathed success at Liverpool.

And it shows the sheer hurt when that success was deemed to be slipping away.

Hansen – and Liverpool’s – lowest ebb that season arrived in late February at Anfield.

Everton players were dancing at the Kop end. Bracewell, Reid, Lineker, Sharp. The Blues were top of the First Division, 12 points clear of Liverpool after a 2-0 win.

“I just remember coming into the dressing room,” Hansen recalls wearily. “And there wasn’t a lot of words said. Because, sometimes, there’s nothing to say.”

There was danger of a power shift on Merseyside.

Liverpool had dominated the 1970s and early 1980s; however, Everton were emerging as a force again.

Under Howard Kendall they were crowned English champions in 1985. And victory at Anfield meant the Blues had consecutive titles in their sights.

“I went out for dinner with Kenny Dalglish that night,” explains Hansen. “And I said to him, ‘Look, this is the worst Liverpool side I’ve ever played in, in my life.’

“‘This team is going to win nothing.’”

He wasn’t just confiding in a friend. Hansen was telling the manager of Liverpool exactly what he thought of his team.

Dalglish had stepped into the role of player-manager in the summer of 1985.

Within days of the Heysel Stadium disaster he replaced the heartbroken Joe Fagan.

Liverpool FC was on its knees. So was the city, ravaged by unemployment and in danger of going under.

Amidst all the turnover and turmoil, few could have foreseen a domestic double.

Especially after Ron Atkinson’s Manchester United won their first 10 matches.

Especially after Everton’s sobering victory at Anfield in February.

However, within three months of Hansen and Dalglish’s solemn dinner date, Liverpool’s players were dancing on the Wembley turf with the FA Cup. The league title had already been sewn up.

They had pipped the Blues on both fronts to achieve what only two sides the previous century had managed.

Most importantly, they had restored pride to a club and its city.

You can relive the season with LFCTV.

Listen as Clive Tyldesley lends his voice to an 86-minute journey from doubt to delirium.

Watch as Hansen and Dalglish are joined by a cast including Craig Johnston, Ronnie Whelan, Jim Beglin and Jan Molby.

And revel in the closing scenes of unbridled joy and emotion, when even Hansen begins to let his guard down.

“Nobody, after we were beaten by Everton, expected us to win the double,” he says. “And yet we went on this great run.

“I think the celebrations afterwards were even better than Rome 1984, Paris 1981 or Wembley 1978. Simply because we won the double out of nowhere.

“To be lifting the trophy in May as a double-winning captain was probably better than anything I ever did at Liverpool.

“It was absolutely awesome.”

And, at last, it’s captivating to watch him smile.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Watch free: On the March with Kenny's Army

LiverpoolFC TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 09:01
On the March with Kenny's Army, the story of Liverpool's double-winning 1986 side, will air tonight on LFCTV at 9pm BST.
Categories: LFC NEWS

'We were sure Trent would become one of the best' - Lucas Leiva

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 08:33

Lucas Leiva can recall a 16-year-old Trent Alexander-Arnold on a 'different level' and his belief early on that the full-back would become one of the best in the world.

Lucas was an important member of the Reds squad around the time Alexander-Arnold started to gain a taste of life in first-team football in the 2015-16 and 2016-17 seasons. 

Even back then, the Academy product was displaying some of the qualities that saw him become a Champions League winner and Ballon d'Or nominee at the tender age of 21.

World class laddddd https://t.co/26a91xesAf

— LucasLeiva87 (Lucas Leiva) 27th Dec 13:16

Speaking on LFCTV's Legends in Lockdown show, Lucas said: "Well, I remember a few moments of Trent. I remember he came with us to play in a friendly game and I think he was 16. He was very shy and Brendan [Rodgers] was in charge. 

"I remember he wasn't comfortable but we could see he was at a different level, I would say, for his age, his quality on the ball. 

"So after he started to train with us in the first team he waited patiently, but we were sure that he would be a Liverpool player and he would be one of the best players in the world. 

"I was sure because you just could see on a daily basis how many qualities he had, his crosses and his passing. He is just a complete full-back."

Watch: This week's Legends in Lockdown in full

The current Lazio midfielder added: "Of course, he still has to improve a lot but he's already done amazing seasons. 

"I think the last two seasons he has been a star player. Trent is a good boy, he's a Liverpool boy and we can see how much he enjoys playing for Liverpool. 

"I always try to help the young players – I think it's important to make them feel comfortable and after it's up to them to learn and improve."

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Categories: LFC NEWS

'We were sure Trent would become one of the best' - Lucas Leiva

LiverpoolFC TV - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 08:33
Lucas Leiva can recall a 16-year-old Trent Alexander-Arnold on a 'different level' and his belief early on that the full-back would become one of the best in the world.
Categories: LFC NEWS

QUIZ: Can you name Liverpool’s top 50 appearance-makers in the Premier League?

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sun, 05/10/2020 - 07:00

Liverpool have had many constants in their time in the Premier League, with some legendary figures, but can you name the club’s top 50 appearance-makers since 1992?

The Reds have been a prominent feature in the current English top flight since its inception, when Sky’s game-changing influence on football began.

A title has so far eluded the club—though a first in 30 years is not far off—while fortunes have been varied, with Liverpool going from the brink of administration to rise to the domestic pinnacle.

Since the Premier League began, 229 different players have featured for the Reds with 12 making a sole appearance—including the likes of Conor Coady, Stephen Darby…and Istvan Kozma—while 90 have reached at least a half-century.

Forty-eight players have made over 100 appearances, with those taking the last two spots in the top 50 tallying 95 and 94 respectively.

So can you name the entire top 50? By definition, most are familiar faces, but many may have been forgotten over the years.

You’ve got 8 minutes – see if you can name all 50! More LFC quizzes here!

* Statistics via LFCHistory.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Appreciating Graeme Souness: A complete midfielder who can put his medals on the table

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 05/09/2020 - 19:00

Nowadays, it is difficult to separate the images of Graeme Souness as player and pundit, but the legendary Liverpool midfielder of the 1970s and ’80s deserves the focus.

More often than not, Souness is established as the elder statesman of the Sky Sports studio, whose playing career ended before the majority of his colleagues’ began.

For Jamie Redknapp, he was even the first manager he worked for at Liverpool, while Jamie Carragher will be familiar with his presence from his days in the academy.

Few of Souness’ media counterparts went toe-to-toe with him on the pitch—Ray Wilkins, the most frequent opponent of his storied career, sadly passed away in 2018—and this has posed a difficult transition for the Scot as he battles with a perception as a dinosaur.

The moments when his fierce temperament gets the better of him garner stifled laughs, while there are certainly points in which his criticism of certain players can be called into question.

One such target is Paul Pogba, the Man United midfielder of dubious commitment who has played just eight times this season, and during his time off the pitch, the Frenchman responded to Souness’ scrutiny.

Pogba claimed he “didn’t even know who he was,” to which the 67-year-old jokingly challenged him to “put his medals on the table,” receiving support from the likes of Carragher and Robbie Fowler.

To engage any further in this would be a disservice to the player Souness was, whose efforts were a defining factor in Liverpool’s most successful era.

Alan Hansen, Kenny Dalglish and Graeme Souness celebrate with the cup, 1978 (Picture by Peter Robinson EMPICS Sport)

Souness’ early years at Tottenham and Middlesbrough were decorated with the trappings of the youngest of three brothers who, by his own admission, “always had something to prove,” and a strong belief in his ability that led to him fall out of favour at his first club.

But when Bob Paisley sought to strengthen the side that won Liverpool’s first-ever European Cup in 1977, he showed faith in his countryman with a record transfer fee of £350,000.

Alan Hansen and Kenny Dalglish had arrived in the summer, with Souness joining the Reds at the start of 1978, and in one triple-swoop of countrymen, Paisley had acquired three true leaders.

His first half-season was slow, playing just 18 times in all competitions, but he announced himself in style with an unstoppable volley to help beat Man United 3-1 at Anfield and ended the campaign as a European champion, playing all 90 minutes in the final against Club Brugge.

Emlyn Hughes was the captain that night, but it was clear in the coming years the shape of Liverpool’s squad would change significantly.

Kevin Keegan had already left, to be replaced by Dalglish, Alan Hansen would take over from Tommy Smith and Souness was successor to Ian Callaghan. By 1979, Phil Thompson inherited the captain’s armband from Hughes.

Delighted Liverpool players (from left) Graeme Souness, Kenny Dalglish and Alan Hansen celebrate with the Milk Cup trophy after they defeated Manchester United 2-1 in extra time at Wembley. It was Liverpool's third successive triumph in the competition, giving manager Bob Paisley a winning farewell to Wembley etires at the end of the season.

Following that steady adjustment period, Souness never dropped below 50 appearances for the Reds in a season, making himself indispensable to Paisley through a blend of grit and quality.

A First Division title would follow in 1979, along with four more in the next five years, while Real Madrid and Roma were vanquished for two more European Cups.

Souness played a key role in every triumph, as part of a core that included Dalglish, Hansen, Thompson, Phil Neal, Ray Kennedy, Ray Clemence, Sammy Lee, Mark Lawrenson, Ian Rush, Terry McDermott and Ronnie Whelan over the years.

Leading by example in the middle of the park, he was Liverpool’s enforcer, demanding a respect from his team-mates that ultimately led to him taking the captaincy from Thompson in 1982.

Off the field, he was an affable character who helped foster a camaraderie in the dressing room, and many strong personal relationships of his own, as the late Michael Robinson told LFCHistory.

“Obviously I was very nervous, but also extremely excited joining up with the squad,” Robinson explained of his move from Brighton in 1983.

“I arrived when all the players were about to have lunch and I looked over and there was an empty seat next to Graeme Souness. He shouted me over and told me he had saved that seat for me.

“He gave me such a warm welcome and made me feel comfortable straight away. He reminded me that Liverpool last season had only conceded 37 goals all season and I scored a couple of them, so now they have one less heartache to worry about.

“Graeme was a great leader and was the best player I ever played with.”

Scotland and Liverpool's Graeme Souness.

He may have been the player the term ‘reducer’ was coined for, but Souness could maintain his discipline when required, and could certainly play too.

His range of passing was outstanding, his shifting feet and dribbling ability allowed him to navigate challenges and his technique in cutting across the ball to fire home helped him to 55 goals from midfield.

He even shared the European Cup Golden Boot with McDermott in 1981 having both scored six goals in a remarkable campaign that saw hat-tricks against both Oulu Palloseura and CSKA Sofia on the way to the final.

Souness was an amalgamation of many of the great midfielders who would pass through the Shankly Gates in years to come; a predecessor for Gerrard, with elements of McMahon, Hamann, Mascherano, Alonso and Fabinho.

“Among midfielders,” Hansen once insisted, “Graeme was the king.”

After six-and-a-half years with the Reds his final game came, fittingly, in the European Cup final in 1984, and it delivered one of his greatest performances.

Up against him in the Roma midfield were Toninho Cerezo and Falcao, two of the most distinguished players of all time, but Souness held his own and the images of him, Hansen and Dalglish holding the trophy aloft will have been vindication for Paisley.

(L-R) Liverpool's Graeme Souness, Kenny Dalglish and Alan Hansen celebrate with the European Cup, 1981 (Peter Robinson/EMPICS Sport)

Souness left for Sampdoria in 1984, winning the Coppa Italia, before heading to Rangers to begin the shift into a managerial career that would herald three league titles in Glasgow ahead of a return to Anfield and the dugout.

His reign on Merseyside, and the mistakes he made over those 33 months—including the too-soon upheaval of playing staff and a wholly ill-advised interview with the S*n after his heart attack in 1992—are for another time.

He is clearly a complicated man, one whose dedication on the field was complemented with an appetite for nightlife off it, but this adds to the richness of his allure, and a balance to his on-screen solemnity.

“Being successful has always been more important to me than being popular,” Souness once explained.

“I long ago accepted that the name of Graeme Souness would top few popularity polls, regardless of whether the votes were cast by my fellow professionals or by the supporters.

“In that respect I suppose you could say that I have achieved my ambition for, thanks to Liverpool, I have a cupboard full of memories and scarcely a friend on the terraces or in the dressing room.”

And to put those medals on the table, there were 14: five league titles, four European Cups, three League Cups and three Charity Shields.

And that’s just counting those he won as a player at Liverpool; in total, it’s 27.

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Peak Owen, Baros breakthrough & terrible transfers – Missed opportunities in Liverpool’s 2002/03 season

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 05/09/2020 - 17:00

Gerard Houllier’s penultimate season in charge of Liverpool was something of a disappointment, as the Reds dropped from second the season before to outside the Champions League spots.

The Reds had finished runners-up in the Premier League in 2002, so optimism was high that the final step could be taken as we watched the World Cup unfold and the new campaign draw close.

Some big-money signings shone in the summer, Houllier had done all his transfer business either with French players or those based in France—a market he knew best—and supporters felt that 02/03 could, finally, be our year.

The one surprise was Nicolas Anelka not making his loan move a permanent one, but Michael Owen was fit and firing so there was much to look forward to.

It didn’t quite work out that way.

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The Reds were inconsistent, frustratingly blunted at times in attack and surprisingly porous at the back, meaning the season quickly became all about a top-four finish yet again.

That particular battle went to the final day and a straight shoot-out with Chelsea at Stamford Bridge…which Liverpool lost, 2-1, consigning them to a campaign in the UEFA Cup instead.

As we finished fifth, the Reds hit only 61 goals in the Premier League—their lowest tally in three years—with only 10 different goalscorers in the competition.

Peak Michael Owen, though we didn’t know it yet

 Liverpool's Michael Owen celebrates his fourth goal against West Bromwich Albion during the Premiership match at the Hawthorns. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Having hit a career-best 19 league goals and 28 in all competitions the previous season, the challenge for Michael Owen was to prove his consistency at that level.

That he did, with an exact replica: 19 in the league, 28 all told.

Owen’s finishing was lethal, his pace still electric and the hamstrings largely held up—he made a career-best 54 appearances in total during 02/03.

Though we, and he, didn’t know it at the time, this was to be as good as it got for the No. 10—injury issues would worsen, his transfers would be questionable and certainly his reputation around Anfield would sour.

Never again did Owen reach 20 goals in a season across all competitions, for any club, and in fact he only managed double figures in league goals on three further occasions.

During 02/03 his finest moment came as he notched his 100th goal for Liverpool in the league as part of a four-goal haul against West Brom.

He was only 23 years old at the end of this campaign, but this was Owen at his best and it was rather downhill thereafter.

Terrible transfers and problems of productivity

 Liverpool's El-Hadji Diouf argues with a biased linesman against Manchester United during the Premiership match at Old Trafford. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Alou Diarra was only ever a backup and youth prospect; Patrice Luzi a third-choice goalkeeper. They can be overlooked.

But in opting not to sign Anelka, Houllier and the club instead made three first-team additions over the summer—and each one proved an expensive, farcical error.

Salif Diao had the energy and desire, but lacked any significant quality in the middle of the park. Bruno Cheyrou was a complete disaster, failing to offer creativity, goal threat or any pace to the attack, netting just once in all competitions as a so-called attacking midfielder.

And El-Hadji Diouf.

The Senegalese forward had impressed at the World Cup, but he was largely wasteful, greedy, weak and lacking the class to be a regular Liverpool forward—and that’s without even beginning to discuss his character, which was distasteful to say the least.

Not one of Houllier’s signings worked out, in a summer when we needed the so-called final piece of the jigsaw. Instead, they took the club backwards.

Baros and Murphy offer hope for the future

 Liverpool's Milan Baros celebrates scoring the sixth goal against West Bromwich Albion during the Premiership match at the Hawthorns. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

While Emile Heskey toiled away, often on the wing, and Diouf did his impressive impersonation of a third-tier forward in front of goal, solace came in the form of a shaven-headed, 20-year-old striker from the Czech Republic.

Milan Baros ended the season as joint-second top scorer, hitting 12 goals from 42 appearances—but it was much more impressive than those numbers suggest, given he was often either a sub or taken off.

The No. 5 averaged a goal every 179 minutes that season as he staked his claim to be a go-to key attacker for the team.

Danny Murphy also brought good consistency in front of goal, also hitting 12 in all competitions, with that tally boosted by a handful of penalties.

Top-corner strikes against Everton, Spurs and Leeds proved his quality, while he was also a key creative conduit in the team all season.

11 games without a win

 Liverpool's manager Ge?rard Houllier pictured against West Bromwich Albion during the Premiership match at the Hawthorns. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

It’s notable watching the video above that during the November and December games, there aren’t too many wild celebrations when goals go in.

There’s a good reason for that: Liverpool didn’t pick up a single league victory in that time.

It seems incredible to believe now, given the unstoppable and win-addicted team Jurgen Klopp has put together, but that Liverpool side simply couldn’t buy a victory: from 9 November 2002 to 11 January 2003, it was 11 games, five draws, six defeats.

Add in the Champions League exit after a 3-3 draw in Basel during that same period and it was a dismal time indeed.

Houllier was firmly back in the dugout after his health problems in 01/02, but there appeared an element of energy or drive missing from the boss and, in truth, this season perhaps showed that he had hit his own peak at Liverpool.

Tough campaign for Gerrard

 Liverpool's Stephen Gerrard and Manchester United's Phil Neville during the Premiership match at Old Trafford. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

The legendary No. 8 was still an up-and-coming No. 17 during this season, with Gerrard on a learning curve which included some tough love from Houllier.

Nobody doubted Gerrard’s quality, but he was finding consistency hard to come by as a 22-year-old at times, meaning a mixed campaign of highs and lows.

There were sublime solo goals against Tottenham and Charlton, but also games where he was left out entirely or, as against Basel in the match above, hooked at half-time.

Nobody can doubt the mental strength of him either, though: less than a year after that hurtful night in Switzerland, he had been appointed club captain.

Changing guard

 Liverpool celebrate beating Manchester United 2-0 to win the Worthington League Cup at the Millennium Stadium. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

The season was very much one of disappointment overall, and perhaps an element of showing that more rebuilding needed to be done.

A handful of familiar and good, or even excellent, players barely had any involvement: Patrik Berger spent the season injured, Jari Litmanen was sold in August, Markus Babbel was back from illness but certainly not the same player and hardly played.

Those coming through were not quite of the required level, either: Chris Kirkland couldn’t establish himself, Neil Mellor made a handful of appearances, Gregory Vignal played once.

The push toward the title didn’t play out the way Houllier wanted, and all in all—despite reaching and winning the League Cup final in Cardiff—it was a largely forgettable, regressive campaign.

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Why Virgil van Dijk thrived on Klopp demands & how there’s more to come

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 05/09/2020 - 15:58

Being the best defender in world football, Virgil van Dijk could be forgiven for thinking he has reached his peak – but he’s only focused on improving even further.

Speaking from home to BT Sport’s Early Kick-Off show on Saturday, the Dutch captain explained at length that his driven nature means he’ll never settle for second best…or even relaxing standards in first place.

Since joining from Southampton he has been a revelation, improving the Reds’ defensive organisation immeasurably, showing incredible consistency in his own game and helping Liverpool become European and world champions under the management of Jurgen Klopp.

And it’s the manager’s expectations of him which pushed Van Dijk to get this far, he explained, with Klopp’s “demands” on all levels meaning our No. 4 had to reach new levels.

“To be absolutely honest, in the first six months that I joined we had more training sessions. It was intense, there were a lot of different things that were going to be asked of me,” Van Dijk said.

"I speak when I want to speak, and feel like speaking, not just for the sake of it."

"Even when we concede and win I'm still grumpy"

Virgil van Dijk talks his persona in the changing room and how he conducts himself…

A born winner ?#EarlyKickOff pic.twitter.com/qEptIqwpfE

— ?? Ja! Watch the Bundesliga live on BT Sport?? (@btsportfootball) May 9, 2020

“And I enjoyed it, I enjoyed it a lot – the hard work, the discussions that I had with certain players about the way Liverpool, the way we, play.

“The manager demands a lot from me and it all helped me become the player I am today. It’s a lot of tactical work, a lot of thinking.

“Obviously as a defender we try to keep a high line, try to put the opponent under pressure at all times. You leave a lot of space sometimes behind you so you had to deal with that as well.”

Of his own character, Van Dijk acknowledged that he was always, in turn, demanding more from others—which we see on the pitch with him instructing, berating or applauding team-mates.

 Liverpool's Virgil van Dijk reacts during the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and West Ham United FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Importantly, that same trait means there’s even more to come from Van Dijk, despite being the best in the game already. That’s great news for Liverpool, and rather less so for the rest of the league.

“I’m not a guy that is quiet to be fair, I try to speak when I want to speak obviously when I feel like speaking.

“And I love winning, hate losing. So when we lose or when we concede and still win I am still grumpy in the beginning.

“There is always room for improvement; I know it and I just try to keep looking for it and keep working on it.

“With the help of all my teammates and obviously the manager, and also the manager of the national team – Ronald Koeman – that will definitely help me get better even now. So, I just keep doing that.”

Van Dijk has again been a stand-out model of consistency and quality as the Reds have gone within touching distance of the Premier League title, and he’ll deserve his medal as much as anyone as and when the Reds are able to wrap up the two more victories they need to be officially crowned champions.

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Allez, The Truth, Sami: 20 years of Liverpool’s Kop mosaics at Anfield

ThisIsAnfield.com - Sat, 05/09/2020 - 15:26

Anfield, and the Kop in particular, is famous for noisy, colourful displays—and they become even more poignant and meaningful when accompanied by a mosaic.

It’s perhaps one of the times when real value comes in having a vantage point of the Kop, rather than being in it: a look behind the goal to the fans, all arms raised in unison, bearing thousands of cards which together display a message, a picture, a memory.

Several years ago, This Is Anfield spoke with the creator and organiser of the very first mosaics, Andrew Knott, about the fascinating process of getting them started and, eventually, into the stadium.

The first one at Anfield was in 1996; since the turn of the century there have been plenty more which graced the ground—and here are the finest of them.

Paisley – Roma – 2001

roma-2001

Soon after the new Millenium came along, a Bob Paisley flag night welcomed Italian side Roma to Merseyside.

Houllier – United – 2001

 Liverpool's supporters on the Spion Kop pay tribute to manager Gerard Houllier with a mosaic before the Premiership match at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Having been taken ill during a match, the Kop paid tribute and showed support to manager Gerard Houllier when rivals United came to town…

Houllier – Roma – 2002

 Liverpool fans on the Spion Kop spell out Allez before the UEFA Champions League Group B match against AS Roma match at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

…and when Houllier returned, his presence and the incredible atmosphere helped send the Reds through in the Champions League at the expense of Roma.

Houllier – Newcastle – 2004

 Liverpool fans make a mosaic on the Spion Kop before the final Premiership game of the season at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

The final game of the French manager’s tenure saw him given a fond farewell, with Rafa Benitez taking charge after this last game of the season in 03/04 against Newcastle.

Amicizia – Juventus – 2005

 The Liverpool fans on the Spion Kop hold a mosaic saying "Friendship" in Italian before the UEFA Champions League Quarter Final 1st Leg match between Liverpool and Juventus at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Back in Europe and against Juventus for the first time since the fateful day at Heysel, Reds reached out in friendship and memory to our Italian opponents.

Truth – Arsenal – 2007

 Liverpool fans on the famous Spion Kop hold up a mosaic reading 'The Truth' for six minutes to remember the 96 supporters who dies at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989 before the FA Cup 3rd Round match against Arsenal at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

The TV cameras infamously tried to ignore it, but Liverpool fans got the message across that the fight for justice would be ongoing.

Shields – West Ham – 2008

 Liverpool's supporters on the Spion Kop show their support for Michael Shields, the Liverpool fan imprisoned in 2005 for a crime he did not commit before the Premiership match against West Ham United at Anfield. (Photo by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Imprisoned fan Michael Shields was given support when West Ham came to Anfield, with the fan accused of a crime in Bulgaria he maintained he did not commit.

Kennedy – Arsenal – 2009

 Liverpool's supporters on the Spion Kop display a mosaic showing Ray Kennedy's white Liverpool number 5, and the Arsenal supporters in the Lower Anfield Road end display his blue Arsenal number 10 to raise awareness of Liverpool fan Karl Coppack's Ray of Hope appeal, which has collected over £40,000 for Kennedy, who suffers from Parkinson's disease; before the Premiership match at Anfield. (Photo by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

The No. 5 was displayed, Ray Kennedy’s shirt number, when the Reds took on the winger’s old club Arsenal to raise awareness for the Ray of Hope appeal. The match itself was a 4-4 classic.

Hyypia – Tottenham – 2009

 David Tickle/Propaganda)

After a decade of loyal service, the Kop paid tribute to former captain Sami Hyypia on his final appearance for the club against Spurs.

The big Finn played 464 games for Liverpool.

Shankly – Wigan – 2009

 David Tickle/Propaganda)

On the 50th anniversary of Bill Shankly’s arrival at Liverpool, a Kop mosaic remembered the most important manager in the club’s history.

Justice – Norwich – 2011

 Liverpool supporters on the famous Spion Kop hold up a mosaic reading JFT96 calling for Justice for the 96 before the Premiership match against Norwich City at Anfield. The fans are backing a campaign for the families of the 96 victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster in 1989 who have waited over 22 years for Justice. (Pic by Vegard Grott/Propaganda)

Continuing to back the campaign for the families of the Hillsborough victims, the home fans held aloft this mosaic demanding justice.

Truth – United – 2012

 Liverpool supporters form a mosaic on the Anfield Road and Centenary Stands calling for Justice for the 96 victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster before the Premiership match against Manchester United at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Almost a year later, an enquiry had finally revealed the truth that Liverpool fans were not to blame for the disaster.

Tributes were paid in the build-up to an emotional game against Manchester United, including this mosaic.

Carragher – QPR – 2013

 Liverpool supporters on the Spion Kop hold up a mosaic 'JC 23' and players form a guard of honour on the pitch for captain Jamie Carragher who made his 737th and final appearance for the Reds during the final Premiership match against Queens Park Rangers of the 2012/13 season at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Jamie Carragher rattled the post from distance with what was almost the best shot of his entire career—in his very final Anfield appearance.

He played 737 times for the Reds, with this game against QPR being the last.

Shankly – United – 2013

 Liverpool supporters on the Spion Kop pay tribute to manager Bill Shankly with a mosaic to celebrate his 100th birthday before the Premiership match against Manchester United at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Another game against United and another mosaic—this time marking what would have been the 100th birthday of the great Bill Shankly.

Justice – Man City – 2014

 The supporters on the Spion Kop make a mosaic toremember the 96 victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster on the 25th Anniversary before the Premiership match against Manchester City at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

With the Reds in action in the days approaching the 25th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster, Anfield once again remembered the fallen and the families.

Five times – Ludogorets – 2015

A return to the European elite and the Champions League saw our five European Cups proudly displayed for Ludogorets and the world to see.

Gerrard – Crystal Palace 2015

 Liverpool supporters on the Spion Kop form a mosaic S8G in tribute for captain Steven Gerrard on his last game at Anfield during the Premier League match against Crystal Palace. (Pic by Lexie Lin/Propaganda)

 Liverpool supporters' mosaic 'Captain' for Steven Gerrard before the Premier League match against Crystal Palace at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

Another farewell appearance, this time with maybe our greatest-ever captain departing Anfield.

Steven Gerrard is an icon to many, and though the team couldn’t give him the parting gift of a win, the mosaic around the ground displayed the thanks and admiration of all.

Family – Villarreal – 2016

 Liverpool supporters mosaic "96 The Greatest... Football Family" before the UEFA Europa League Semi-Final 2nd Leg match against Villarreal CF at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

 Liverpool supporters' mosaic on the Spion Kop "Football Family" before the UEFA Europa League Semi-Final 2nd Leg match against Villarreal CF at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

The verdicts from the Hillsborough inquests had been passed down before this game and Villarreal were given an almighty fright by the atmosphere.

An emotional win sent Liverpool into the Europa League final.

Hillsborough – Bournemouth – 2017

 Liverpool supporters stand for a minute's applause to remember the victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster, with the Spion Kop forming a 96 mosaic, before the FA Premier League match at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

As the 28th anniversary approached, Anfield paid tribute ahead of the league encounter against Bournemouth.

Moran – Everton – 2017

 Liverpool supporters' mosaic tribute to Ronnie Moran "Bugsy" on the Spion Kop shown on a television monitor before the FA Premier League match, the 228th Merseyside Derby, against Everton at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

 Liverpool supporters' mosaic tribute to Ronnie Moran "Bugsy" on the Spion Kop before the FA Premier League match, the 228th Merseyside Derby, against Everton at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

One of Liverpool’s greatest-ever servants, Ronnie Moran, was paid tribute ahead of the Merseyside derby.

A player, caretaker manager and influential backroom staff member for 49 years, Moran had passed away the week previous at the age of 83.

125th birthday – Burnley – 2017

 Supporters form a mosaic on the Centenary and Spion Kop stands to mark the 125th Anniversary of Liverpool Football Club before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool and Burnley at Anfield. (Pic by Peter Powell/Propaganda)

125 years of Liverpool Football Club was marked ahead of the Premier LEague game against Burnley in September 2017.

30 years – Chelsea – 2019

 Liverpool supporters form a mosaic to remember 30 years since the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Chelsea FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

With the 30th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster approaching, Liverpool fans marked the occasion was another poignant mosaic and atmosphere.

Paisley – Crystal Palace – 2019

 Supporters on the Spion Kop form a mosaic “Paisley 100” to celebrate 100 years since the birth of the club’s most successful manager Bob Paisley before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Crystal Palace FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

On what would have been Bob Paisley’s 100th birthday, the stadium remembered the manager who won three European Cups.

Hillsborough – Everton – 2019

 Liverpool supporters mosaic tribute to the 96 victims of the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster before the FA Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Everton FC, the 234th Merseyside Derby, at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

A Merseyside derby and a tribute to the victims of the Hillsborough disaster, with both clubs coming together to continue their support and fight for justice.

This came after the police match commander was acquitted of criminal charges in a retrial.

Six times – Norwich – 2019

 Liverpool supporters form a mosaic of a European Cup before the opening FA Premier League match of the season between Liverpool FC and Norwich City FC at Anfield. (Pic by David Rawcliffe/Propaganda)

And finally, earlier this season, Liverpool returned to domestic action as Champions of Europe once more.

Norwich were the visitors and Jurgen Klopp‘s team were the best on the planet—and began their journey to the top of the Premier League table, where we remain today, waiting to complete that particular journey in 2019/20—and you can only imagine that another mosaic will, when fans are eventually allowed inside stadiums, follow to recognise that accomplishment, too.

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Virgil van Dijk: I keep looking and working for improvement

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 05/09/2020 - 14:00
Virgil van Dijk believes the demands placed upon on him by Jürgen Klopp and Liverpool have been fundamental in helping him elevate his game to its current levels.
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Jürgen Klopp: I saw Steven Gerrard while I was on the phone to Gerard Houllier!

LiverpoolFC.TV - Sat, 05/09/2020 - 13:25

Jürgen Klopp is seeing Steven Gerrard regularly while the Liverpool manager and legendary former captain go about their daily exercise routines during lockdown.

In an interview with BT Sport, the boss was asked which retired player he would sign for the Reds.

“Easy. Steven Gerrard, Stevie. That’s easy!” Klopp replied, before telling a story that also features another Anfield icon and is sure to bring a smile to fans’ faces.

“The funny part is that I think I live for four-and-a-half years in the same town as Steven Gerrard and I met him never before, but since the lockdown I saw him already six or seven times. I go for a dog walk or a run or whatever, and he has a walk with the family and stuff like this so we saw each other more often than in all the time together before. 

“One day I was on the phone with Gerard Houllier and met Steven Gerrard in the same moment, so that was really cool! These kind of things happen only in lockdown so some positive things happened for me as well.”

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Categories: LFC NEWS

Jürgen Klopp: I saw Steven Gerrard while I was on the phone to Gerard Houllier!

LiverpoolFC TV - Sat, 05/09/2020 - 13:25
Jürgen Klopp is seeing Steven Gerrard regularly while the Liverpool manager and legendary former captain go about their daily exercise routines during lockdown.
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